Immune Health

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If you took a microscope and zoomed on your intestine, you would find tens of trillions of bacteria that make up your gut microbiota. This community of microorganisms plays a key role in your health and wellbeing, as already reported on this blog, but it can also be affected by a range of external factors, including what we eat and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

If you took a microscope and zoomed on your intestine, you would find tens of trillions of bacteria that make up your gut microbiota. This community of microorganisms plays a key role in your health and wellbeing, as already reported on this blog, but it can also be affected by a range of external factors, including what we eat and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the onset of several immune- and metabolic-related disorders. The specific role of exogenous factors leading to dysbiosis is still under investigation, and the primary factors contributing to gut microbiome dysbiosis and ultimately to human disease are not clear. A new study, led by Dr. Boakai K. Robertson from the Department of Biological Sciences…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the onset of several immune- and metabolic-related disorders. The specific role of exogenous factors leading to dysbiosis is still under investigation, and the primary factors contributing to gut microbiome dysbiosis and ultimately to human disease are not clear. A new study, led by Dr. Boakai K. Robertson from the Department of Biological Sciences…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Changes in the gut microbiota are involved in both homeostatic and inflammatory immune responses. T regulatory (Treg) immune cells tolerate diverse bacterial communities, whereas inflammatory conditions activate T effector (Teff) immune cells to react against the body’s own commensal microbiota. However, little is known regarding the role of commensal bacteria in inducing Teff cells during inflammation. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Changes in the gut microbiota are involved in both homeostatic and inflammatory immune responses. T regulatory (Treg) immune cells tolerate diverse bacterial communities, whereas inflammatory conditions activate T effector (Teff) immune cells to react against the body’s own commensal microbiota. However, little is known regarding the role of commensal bacteria in inducing Teff cells during inflammation. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It is known that the gut microbiota provides colonization resistance (CR) against many infections by enteric pathogens. Although murine experimental models have been previously developed to study the underlying mechanisms of CR in the host, a better understanding is needed in order to develop new approaches for prevention of foodborne pathogen infection. A recent study, led by Dr. Simone Becattini…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It is known that the gut microbiota provides colonization resistance (CR) against many infections by enteric pathogens. Although murine experimental models have been previously developed to study the underlying mechanisms of CR in the host, a better understanding is needed in order to develop new approaches for prevention of foodborne pathogen infection. A recent study, led by Dr. Simone Becattini…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados