Immune Health

News Watch

The brain is the most highly protected organ in the human body. It has a layer of cells covering it that act as a relentless guard that regulates the passage and exchange of nutrients and molecules between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma, the nervous tissue in the brain. This barrier - the so-called blood-brain barrier - is essential for…

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GMFH Editing Team

The brain is the most highly protected organ in the human body. It has a layer of cells covering it that act as a relentless guard that regulates the passage and exchange of nutrients and molecules between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma, the nervous tissue in the brain. This barrier - the so-called blood-brain barrier - is essential for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronical autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, the brain and other organs. In Spain, between forty and fifty thousand people suffer from lupus, according to the Spanish Association of Lupus (Federación Española de Lupus). A new research study, lead by researchers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronical autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, the brain and other organs. In Spain, between forty and fifty thousand people suffer from lupus, according to the Spanish Association of Lupus (Federación Española de Lupus). A new research study, lead by researchers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The idea that being exposed to animals since early days might reinforce the immune system (part of the so-called “hygiene hypothesis”) has been referred by different studies, A new study recently published in PNAS reinforces this theory and suggests that this protecting effect is due to the changes undergone by the microbial community living in the digestive tract, the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The idea that being exposed to animals since early days might reinforce the immune system (part of the so-called “hygiene hypothesis”) has been referred by different studies, A new study recently published in PNAS reinforces this theory and suggests that this protecting effect is due to the changes undergone by the microbial community living in the digestive tract, the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The fact that newborns are especially vulnerable to bacterial infections is not necessarily a sign of immaturity or even a bad thing; rather it could be understood as something positive. In experiments with mice carried out by paediatricians at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (USA), it has been discovered that a mice newborn’s body deliberately “deactivates” its immune system for a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The fact that newborns are especially vulnerable to bacterial infections is not necessarily a sign of immaturity or even a bad thing; rather it could be understood as something positive. In experiments with mice carried out by paediatricians at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (USA), it has been discovered that a mice newborn’s body deliberately “deactivates” its immune system for a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Germ-free mice have been used widely during the last decade for studying the relevance and effect of resident bacteria on host physiology and pathology. Experimental data using animals with controlled gut colonization have identified three main primary functions of the gut microbiota: a) metabolic activities that result in salvage of energy and absorbable nutrients; b) protection of the host against…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Germ-free mice have been used widely during the last decade for studying the relevance and effect of resident bacteria on host physiology and pathology. Experimental data using animals with controlled gut colonization have identified three main primary functions of the gut microbiota: a) metabolic activities that result in salvage of energy and absorbable nutrients; b) protection of the host against…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The gut microbiota exerts a miscellany of protective, structural and metabolic effects on the intestinal mucosa. Although it is well recognized that the composition of the colonizing gut microbiota contributes to normal immunity by educating the host immune system on what to fight, little is known regarding how the gut microbiota, when dysregulated, can promote autoimmunity. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The gut microbiota exerts a miscellany of protective, structural and metabolic effects on the intestinal mucosa. Although it is well recognized that the composition of the colonizing gut microbiota contributes to normal immunity by educating the host immune system on what to fight, little is known regarding how the gut microbiota, when dysregulated, can promote autoimmunity. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has found that multiple sclerosis (MS) patients may have a specific microbial signature in their gut microbiota that could impact disease pathogenesis. However, it is not known to what extent structural and functional changes in the gut microbiota are primary contributors to MS pathogenesis and which underlying mechanisms are involved. A new study, led by Dr. Sergio Baranzini…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has found that multiple sclerosis (MS) patients may have a specific microbial signature in their gut microbiota that could impact disease pathogenesis. However, it is not known to what extent structural and functional changes in the gut microbiota are primary contributors to MS pathogenesis and which underlying mechanisms are involved. A new study, led by Dr. Sergio Baranzini…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous preclinical research (here; here) has shown that the gut microbiota helps modulate the host response to influenza infection -germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice usually exhibit weak protection against influenza virus. However, underlying mechanisms mediating this effect and microbial factors involved have not been fully elucidated. A recent study, led by Dr. Thaddeus Stappenbeck from the Department of Pathology and Immunology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous preclinical research (here; here) has shown that the gut microbiota helps modulate the host response to influenza infection -germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice usually exhibit weak protection against influenza virus. However, underlying mechanisms mediating this effect and microbial factors involved have not been fully elucidated. A recent study, led by Dr. Thaddeus Stappenbeck from the Department of Pathology and Immunology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados