Gut Microbiota

News Watch

After the success of the First Gut Microbiota for Health Summit (Evian, March 2012), the second edition has been planned for February 2013. From the 24th to the 26th of February, Madrid (Spain) will be the capital of gut microbiota. This international event will gather more than 200 scientists from different fields of expertise who are leading the latest discoveries…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the success of the First Gut Microbiota for Health Summit (Evian, March 2012), the second edition has been planned for February 2013. From the 24th to the 26th of February, Madrid (Spain) will be the capital of gut microbiota. This international event will gather more than 200 scientists from different fields of expertise who are leading the latest discoveries…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In this interview, Prof. James Versalovic says that, as for the Human Genome Project, we’re only witnessing the first steps of gut microbiota research. In the course of the past few years, the scientific question has evolved from “what bacteria live with us?” to “what do they do?”, a key element when trying to define the gut microbiota as a multi-cellular microbial…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In this interview, Prof. James Versalovic says that, as for the Human Genome Project, we’re only witnessing the first steps of gut microbiota research. In the course of the past few years, the scientific question has evolved from “what bacteria live with us?” to “what do they do?”, a key element when trying to define the gut microbiota as a multi-cellular microbial…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Great projects such as Human Microbiome Project and MetaHIT have arrived to the end in the last two years, but it doesn’t mean research on gut microbiota stops. A second generation of studies has started, evidencing the relevance of this topic. Scientist are focusing on gut microbiota, increasing the current knowledge about its importance and relation with our health and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Great projects such as Human Microbiome Project and MetaHIT have arrived to the end in the last two years, but it doesn’t mean research on gut microbiota stops. A second generation of studies has started, evidencing the relevance of this topic. Scientist are focusing on gut microbiota, increasing the current knowledge about its importance and relation with our health and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The year 2012 is coming to an end and we would like to take this opportunity to remind everyone why we believe that it has been the year of the gut microbiota. Back in 2011, the European Society for Neurogastroenterology & Motility created the Gut Microbiota and Health Section to focus on this field. The launch of this new section,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The year 2012 is coming to an end and we would like to take this opportunity to remind everyone why we believe that it has been the year of the gut microbiota. Back in 2011, the European Society for Neurogastroenterology & Motility created the Gut Microbiota and Health Section to focus on this field. The launch of this new section,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Today we want to share with you a TED video where the scientist Bonnie Bassler explains How bacteria can “talk”. She studies how bacteria can communicate with one another, through chemical signals, to act as a unit. This video is from 2009, and yet then her work was seen as crucial in the development of more potent medicine. During this…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Today we want to share with you a TED video where the scientist Bonnie Bassler explains How bacteria can “talk”. She studies how bacteria can communicate with one another, through chemical signals, to act as a unit. This video is from 2009, and yet then her work was seen as crucial in the development of more potent medicine. During this…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent research has shed light on the importance of gut microbiota both during pregnancy and early life. Despite recent research that shows the placenta is not sterile, as previously thought, gut microbiota colonization in the first days and weeks after birth appears to have enormous significance for post-natal life, says Professor Olivier Goulet, from Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades (Paris, France). According…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent research has shed light on the importance of gut microbiota both during pregnancy and early life. Despite recent research that shows the placenta is not sterile, as previously thought, gut microbiota colonization in the first days and weeks after birth appears to have enormous significance for post-natal life, says Professor Olivier Goulet, from Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades (Paris, France). According…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Previous research has shown that the severity of immunodeficiency in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is related to changes in both the gut virome and bacterial microbiome. Although microbiota-targeted interventions are considered nowadays a potential therapeutic strategy for HIV-infected subjects, little data is available regarding the efficacy of those interventions in humans. A new double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the severity of immunodeficiency in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is related to changes in both the gut virome and bacterial microbiome. Although microbiota-targeted interventions are considered nowadays a potential therapeutic strategy for HIV-infected subjects, little data is available regarding the efficacy of those interventions in humans. A new double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, led by…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The human gut microbiota composition and metabolic activities are modulated by the diet, and reciprocally, host metabolism and metabolites also interact with the gut microbiota and diet, shaping a complex interacting network that relates to gut health. Several factors can influence the human gut microbiota, with diet being a very important one. Not only dietary pattern (vegetarian vs. omnivorous dietary…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The human gut microbiota composition and metabolic activities are modulated by the diet, and reciprocally, host metabolism and metabolites also interact with the gut microbiota and diet, shaping a complex interacting network that relates to gut health. Several factors can influence the human gut microbiota, with diet being a very important one. Not only dietary pattern (vegetarian vs. omnivorous dietary…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.