Gut Microbiota

News Watch

Did you know that we can find more than 100 trillion of good bacteria in our body? According to a study carried out by more than 80 universities and 200 researchers, humans are made up of more microbes than human cells. Although these figures show us the importance of microbes in our health, the knowledge in that field remained largely…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Did you know that we can find more than 100 trillion of good bacteria in our body? According to a study carried out by more than 80 universities and 200 researchers, humans are made up of more microbes than human cells. Although these figures show us the importance of microbes in our health, the knowledge in that field remained largely…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Many articles about gut microbiota have been appearing in mainstream media in the near past and important newspapers and magazines such as The Huffington Post, The Economist, The New York Times and The Guardian, among others, have recently addressed this subject. Something similar is happening in the scientific community, as more and more experts are keeping a close eye on…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Many articles about gut microbiota have been appearing in mainstream media in the near past and important newspapers and magazines such as The Huffington Post, The Economist, The New York Times and The Guardian, among others, have recently addressed this subject. Something similar is happening in the scientific community, as more and more experts are keeping a close eye on…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

In the year 2006, a PubMed search for “microbiome” papers yielded just 119. Now, a decade later in the year 2016, that number was 4,805. Given the reality of limited funding and know-how, the exponential growth in the field of microbiome science means researchers will face an increasingly competitive milieu. But this worldwide network of scientific growth, which currently has…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In the year 2006, a PubMed search for “microbiome” papers yielded just 119. Now, a decade later in the year 2016, that number was 4,805. Given the reality of limited funding and know-how, the exponential growth in the field of microbiome science means researchers will face an increasingly competitive milieu. But this worldwide network of scientific growth, which currently has…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The Gut Microbiota & Health section of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology & Motility (ESNM), the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) look forward to welcoming a worldwide group of clinical researchers and healthcare professionals to the 2017 Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit on March 11th and 12th! The event, which counts…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Gut Microbiota & Health section of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology & Motility (ESNM), the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) look forward to welcoming a worldwide group of clinical researchers and healthcare professionals to the 2017 Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit on March 11th and 12th! The event, which counts…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It has been reported that nitrate-containing compounds found in certain foods—typically, processed meats, leafy vegetables, chocolate and some wines—as well as food preservatives and nitrate-containing drugs may trigger migraines as a side effect, but the possible mechanistic connection between nitrates, gut microbiome and the likelihood of experiencing migraines is unknown. A recent study, led by Rob Knight from the Department…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been reported that nitrate-containing compounds found in certain foods—typically, processed meats, leafy vegetables, chocolate and some wines—as well as food preservatives and nitrate-containing drugs may trigger migraines as a side effect, but the possible mechanistic connection between nitrates, gut microbiome and the likelihood of experiencing migraines is unknown. A recent study, led by Rob Knight from the Department…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

In both mice and humans the gut microbiota exhibits a circadian rhythm and it may be perturbed following circadian misalignment. Previous research has found that the circadian clock of the host may elicit responses from the circadian clocks of commensal gut bacteria. Although changes to the gut microbiota have been linked to the metabolic disturbances that occur after sleep deprivation…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

In both mice and humans the gut microbiota exhibits a circadian rhythm and it may be perturbed following circadian misalignment. Previous research has found that the circadian clock of the host may elicit responses from the circadian clocks of commensal gut bacteria. Although changes to the gut microbiota have been linked to the metabolic disturbances that occur after sleep deprivation…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Measuring bacterial composition is relatively straightforward with currently available tools, but scientists so far understand little about the factors contributing to successful colonization and a stable microbiota composition at any point in time. Researchers from the University of Oregon in Eugene (USA) recently published a study that used zebrafish as a vertebrate model for investigating bacterial competition in the gut.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Measuring bacterial composition is relatively straightforward with currently available tools, but scientists so far understand little about the factors contributing to successful colonization and a stable microbiota composition at any point in time. Researchers from the University of Oregon in Eugene (USA) recently published a study that used zebrafish as a vertebrate model for investigating bacterial competition in the gut.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter