Gut Microbiota

News Watch

After the success of the first two editions (held in Evian and Madrid in 2012 and 2013 respectively), experts from all over the world are getting ready to head to Miami (USA) for the 2014 edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit, to be held on 8 and 9 March. For two days, scientists from a range of…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the success of the first two editions (held in Evian and Madrid in 2012 and 2013 respectively), experts from all over the world are getting ready to head to Miami (USA) for the 2014 edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit, to be held on 8 and 9 March. For two days, scientists from a range of…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

  Image: The tree of life made out of Nasonia microbes. (Robert Brucker/Vanderbilt) Science Magazine has recently published a study carried out by Dr. Robert Brucker and Dr. Seth R. Bordenstein from Vanderbilt University in Nashville (USA) that seems to provide clues reinforcing the “hologenome theory of evolution”. This research suggests that the gut microbiome may have a fundamental influence…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

  Image: The tree of life made out of Nasonia microbes. (Robert Brucker/Vanderbilt) Science Magazine has recently published a study carried out by Dr. Robert Brucker and Dr. Seth R. Bordenstein from Vanderbilt University in Nashville (USA) that seems to provide clues reinforcing the “hologenome theory of evolution”. This research suggests that the gut microbiome may have a fundamental influence…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We interviewed Prof. Paul O’Toole, Senior Lecturer at University College Cork, to discuss bacterial colonisation, or how bacteria reach the digestive tract from birth. The kind of birth, the family environment and food are some of the factors that initially influence the development of the gut microbiota, explains Prof. O’Toole. With time, the microbiota stabilises (except when we are affected…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We interviewed Prof. Paul O’Toole, Senior Lecturer at University College Cork, to discuss bacterial colonisation, or how bacteria reach the digestive tract from birth. The kind of birth, the family environment and food are some of the factors that initially influence the development of the gut microbiota, explains Prof. O’Toole. With time, the microbiota stabilises (except when we are affected…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have already explained that the bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract – the gut microbiota – carry out key functions in terms of people’s health. Among these tasks, this “organ” (as described by some scientists) plays an essential role in our body’s defences. A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (USA) recently observed that the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have already explained that the bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract – the gut microbiota – carry out key functions in terms of people’s health. Among these tasks, this “organ” (as described by some scientists) plays an essential role in our body’s defences. A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (USA) recently observed that the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

When it comes to studying the effects of complex dietary carbohydrates on the gut microbiota, resistant starch (RS) is a type of dietary fibre that is receiving increasing attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the gut microbiota. Although starch is a major energy source in human and animal diets, little is…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

When it comes to studying the effects of complex dietary carbohydrates on the gut microbiota, resistant starch (RS) is a type of dietary fibre that is receiving increasing attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the gut microbiota. Although starch is a major energy source in human and animal diets, little is…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Dietary components’ effects on host health are thought to be mediated in part by their specific effects on the gut microbiome. Probiotics and prebiotics are the most studied substrates, whereas little is known about the impact of dietary fats on the gut microbiome in human cohorts. A new study, led by Dr. Ana M. Valdes from the Faculty of Medicine…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Dietary components’ effects on host health are thought to be mediated in part by their specific effects on the gut microbiome. Probiotics and prebiotics are the most studied substrates, whereas little is known about the impact of dietary fats on the gut microbiome in human cohorts. A new study, led by Dr. Ana M. Valdes from the Faculty of Medicine…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

When Leo Tolstoy wrote the first line of his classic novel Anna Karenina—“All happy families are like one another; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way"—he probably never thought it would apply to gut microbiomes. But researchers from University of Washington (USA) and Oregon State University (USA) recently put forward the "Anna Karenina principle" as a way of…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When Leo Tolstoy wrote the first line of his classic novel Anna Karenina—“All happy families are like one another; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way"—he probably never thought it would apply to gut microbiomes. But researchers from University of Washington (USA) and Oregon State University (USA) recently put forward the "Anna Karenina principle" as a way of…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

It is suspected that early-life gut microbiota colonization can result in long-lasting consequences that may increase the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood. The first 3 years of life appear to represent the most critical period for dietary interventions with the goal of manipulating microbiota to improve child growth and development and positively affect health. The role of perinatal nutrition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

It is suspected that early-life gut microbiota colonization can result in long-lasting consequences that may increase the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood. The first 3 years of life appear to represent the most critical period for dietary interventions with the goal of manipulating microbiota to improve child growth and development and positively affect health. The role of perinatal nutrition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous studies have found that ageing is related to decreased gut microbiota diversity and increased opportunistic pathogens together with a low-grade inflammatory state, which may lead to an increased morbidity and frailty. By contrast, long-lived people appear to have a gut microbiota profile enriched in beneficial bacteria involved in the production of short-chain fatty acids. Although hospitalized elderly people are…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous studies have found that ageing is related to decreased gut microbiota diversity and increased opportunistic pathogens together with a low-grade inflammatory state, which may lead to an increased morbidity and frailty. By contrast, long-lived people appear to have a gut microbiota profile enriched in beneficial bacteria involved in the production of short-chain fatty acids. Although hospitalized elderly people are…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados