Gut Microbiota

News Watch

As we explained in one of the first posts on this blog, the American  National Institutesof Health (NIH) launched a five-year initiative in 2008 aimed at studying the ins and outs of the human microbiome to “characterize microbial communities found at multiple human body sites and look for correlations between changes in the microbiome and human health”. Today, we’d like…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in one of the first posts on this blog, the American  National Institutesof Health (NIH) launched a five-year initiative in 2008 aimed at studying the ins and outs of the human microbiome to “characterize microbial communities found at multiple human body sites and look for correlations between changes in the microbiome and human health”. Today, we’d like…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is often said that “we are what we eat” and, as research into the relationship between diet and the gut microbiota progresses, the expression becomes even more meaningful. It is well known that a diet rich in live cultures like probiotics may change the composition of the gut flora. Furthermore, consuming this kind of products may also influence brain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is often said that “we are what we eat” and, as research into the relationship between diet and the gut microbiota progresses, the expression becomes even more meaningful. It is well known that a diet rich in live cultures like probiotics may change the composition of the gut flora. Furthermore, consuming this kind of products may also influence brain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

“You are not human, you are a walking bacterial colony,” says the Belgian researcher Jeroen Raes, from the Flanders Institute of Biology, in this video from TEDxBrussels. Raes discusses issues that go from the gut microbiota’s size to its functions, as well as its relationship with some of the most prevalent diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. A video that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

“You are not human, you are a walking bacterial colony,” says the Belgian researcher Jeroen Raes, from the Flanders Institute of Biology, in this video from TEDxBrussels. Raes discusses issues that go from the gut microbiota’s size to its functions, as well as its relationship with some of the most prevalent diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. A video that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Abdominal gases are created in the intestine during digestion and, beyond the jokes that this subject usually generates, it is an absolutely normal physiological process. In some cases, however, abdominal gases can be a source of discomfort. This situation may now have a scientific explanation. A study by the Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Digestive Tract Group at Vall d’Hebron…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Abdominal gases are created in the intestine during digestion and, beyond the jokes that this subject usually generates, it is an absolutely normal physiological process. In some cases, however, abdominal gases can be a source of discomfort. This situation may now have a scientific explanation. A study by the Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Digestive Tract Group at Vall d’Hebron…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) held its annual meeting in Chicago at the end of June, 2017. This meeting featured the latest science in the probiotic and prebiotic fields, consistent with ISAPP’s mission to advance the science of probiotics and prebiotics. Topics of discussion ranged from "How to define useful biomarkers for health?" to an update…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) held its annual meeting in Chicago at the end of June, 2017. This meeting featured the latest science in the probiotic and prebiotic fields, consistent with ISAPP’s mission to advance the science of probiotics and prebiotics. Topics of discussion ranged from "How to define useful biomarkers for health?" to an update…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

Changes in the gut microbiota are involved in both homeostatic and inflammatory immune responses. T regulatory (Treg) immune cells tolerate diverse bacterial communities, whereas inflammatory conditions activate T effector (Teff) immune cells to react against the body’s own commensal microbiota. However, little is known regarding the role of commensal bacteria in inducing Teff cells during inflammation. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Changes in the gut microbiota are involved in both homeostatic and inflammatory immune responses. T regulatory (Treg) immune cells tolerate diverse bacterial communities, whereas inflammatory conditions activate T effector (Teff) immune cells to react against the body’s own commensal microbiota. However, little is known regarding the role of commensal bacteria in inducing Teff cells during inflammation. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been reported as an environmental factor involved in anorexia nervosa (AN) development. A review published in 2015, led by Dr. Cynthia Bulik from Departments of Nutrition and Psychiatry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (North Carolina) and the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden), has previously reported…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been reported as an environmental factor involved in anorexia nervosa (AN) development. A review published in 2015, led by Dr. Cynthia Bulik from Departments of Nutrition and Psychiatry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (North Carolina) and the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden), has previously reported…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados