Gut Microbiota

News Watch

In this video proposed by GMFH, we talked to Boston-based registered dietitian Kate Scarlata about how gut microbiota influences our health and our wellbeing. “Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease —even anxiety and depression— have all been linked to changes in the gut microbiome,” recalls Kate Scarlata. She also explains that most people are not eating enough fiber (food…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In this video proposed by GMFH, we talked to Boston-based registered dietitian Kate Scarlata about how gut microbiota influences our health and our wellbeing. “Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease —even anxiety and depression— have all been linked to changes in the gut microbiome,” recalls Kate Scarlata. She also explains that most people are not eating enough fiber (food…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Think about this: from the moment you are conceived until you are 1000 days old, your growth is exponential, faster than in any other period of life. For the first 9 months, you go from two cells to a newborn measuring 50cm in length and 3 kg weight. Then, between birth and 3 years of age, your body size doubles…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Think about this: from the moment you are conceived until you are 1000 days old, your growth is exponential, faster than in any other period of life. For the first 9 months, you go from two cells to a newborn measuring 50cm in length and 3 kg weight. Then, between birth and 3 years of age, your body size doubles…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

On June 27th is the World Microbiome Day; on this occasion GMFH editors took time to interview Dr. Rob Knight, the founding Director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of California San Diego, about some key aspects of gut microbiota and how microbes could help mitigate the raise of antibiotic resistance.   Factors…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

On June 27th is the World Microbiome Day; on this occasion GMFH editors took time to interview Dr. Rob Knight, the founding Director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of California San Diego, about some key aspects of gut microbiota and how microbes could help mitigate the raise of antibiotic resistance.   Factors…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The microorganisms that live in our guts are more important than many of us think. However, one of the biggest threats to the health and diversity of our gut microbiota is the inappropriate use of antibiotics. To raise awareness on this issue and empower people to use antibiotics responsibility, the World Microbiome Day 2019 theme is ‘Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics.’…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The microorganisms that live in our guts are more important than many of us think. However, one of the biggest threats to the health and diversity of our gut microbiota is the inappropriate use of antibiotics. To raise awareness on this issue and empower people to use antibiotics responsibility, the World Microbiome Day 2019 theme is ‘Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics.’…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Fiber is a key overlooked nutrient in the diets of many. Although some fiber cannot be digested by humans, it can be broken down by the microbes in our gut – a community of bacteria called the gut microbiota. Like fiber, prebiotics also act as food for beneficial microbes in the gut, and many current prebiotics are actually considered to…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Fiber is a key overlooked nutrient in the diets of many. Although some fiber cannot be digested by humans, it can be broken down by the microbes in our gut – a community of bacteria called the gut microbiota. Like fiber, prebiotics also act as food for beneficial microbes in the gut, and many current prebiotics are actually considered to…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Research & Practice

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut can alter the chemical structures of drugs, leading to changes in their bioavailability, toxicity and efficacy. Although the gut microbial enzymes responsible for these chemical modifications are poorly understood, microbial mediation of therapeutic effects has been reported for metformin, chemotherapeutic drugs and antidepressants. A gut microbial enzymatic pathway is involved in metabolizing the drug…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut can alter the chemical structures of drugs, leading to changes in their bioavailability, toxicity and efficacy. Although the gut microbial enzymes responsible for these chemical modifications are poorly understood, microbial mediation of therapeutic effects has been reported for metformin, chemotherapeutic drugs and antidepressants. A gut microbial enzymatic pathway is involved in metabolizing the drug…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Preterm infants are at a high risk of growth failure that may affect their long-term health outcomes. Different factors have been involved in the etiology of postnatal growth failure in preterm infants, but despite research efforts regarding clinical management, growth failure rates continue to increase. Although differences in gut microbiota composition have been found in preterm infants compared with full-term…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Preterm infants are at a high risk of growth failure that may affect their long-term health outcomes. Different factors have been involved in the etiology of postnatal growth failure in preterm infants, but despite research efforts regarding clinical management, growth failure rates continue to increase. Although differences in gut microbiota composition have been found in preterm infants compared with full-term…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The modification of the human gut microbiota’s composition and function is one of the plausible mechanisms that has just recently started being explored in relation to how exercise affects health. Although gut microbiome composition tends to show higher variability under environmental pressures, its diversity functionality tends to remain consistent within and across subjects. In professional athletes, however, little is known…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The modification of the human gut microbiota’s composition and function is one of the plausible mechanisms that has just recently started being explored in relation to how exercise affects health. Although gut microbiome composition tends to show higher variability under environmental pressures, its diversity functionality tends to remain consistent within and across subjects. In professional athletes, however, little is known…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.