Gut Brain Axis

News Watch

For some time, science has known that exposure to vaginal microbiota is crucial for newborn health. When babies pass through the birth canal, they get a healthy dose of the mother’s bacteria that helps them establish their own collection of microbes and turn on their immune system. However, stress during pregnancy may alter the mother’s microbiome and that can interfere…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For some time, science has known that exposure to vaginal microbiota is crucial for newborn health. When babies pass through the birth canal, they get a healthy dose of the mother’s bacteria that helps them establish their own collection of microbes and turn on their immune system. However, stress during pregnancy may alter the mother’s microbiome and that can interfere…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut bacteria may play a crucial role in inducing anxiety and depression, according to a new study by researchers at McMaster University (Canada), published in the journal Nature Communications. The research, carried out in rodents, is the first of its kind to explore how gut microbiota works in the onset of altered behaviour deriving from early life stress. A team…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut bacteria may play a crucial role in inducing anxiety and depression, according to a new study by researchers at McMaster University (Canada), published in the journal Nature Communications. The research, carried out in rodents, is the first of its kind to explore how gut microbiota works in the onset of altered behaviour deriving from early life stress. A team…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Abdominal pain, bloating, changes in stool frequency and consistency. These are just some of the symptoms associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a chronic functional disorder whose origins are unknown. It has no known treatment, only recommendations to keep symptoms at bay. In Western countries, almost two out of ten gastroenterology consultations are motivated by this disorder.   Professor Magnus Simrén, researcher at…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Abdominal pain, bloating, changes in stool frequency and consistency. These are just some of the symptoms associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a chronic functional disorder whose origins are unknown. It has no known treatment, only recommendations to keep symptoms at bay. In Western countries, almost two out of ten gastroenterology consultations are motivated by this disorder.   Professor Magnus Simrén, researcher at…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

  One in 160 children suffers from some kind of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to the World Health Organization. These are a series of alterations in brain development characterized by a wide range of symptoms and levels of disability and while some children have slight damage, others can be seriously disabled. Although a range of factors are usually considered,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

  One in 160 children suffers from some kind of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to the World Health Organization. These are a series of alterations in brain development characterized by a wide range of symptoms and levels of disability and while some children have slight damage, others can be seriously disabled. Although a range of factors are usually considered,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The brain is the most highly protected organ in the human body. It has a layer of cells covering it that act as a relentless guard that regulates the passage and exchange of nutrients and molecules between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma, the nervous tissue in the brain. This barrier - the so-called blood-brain barrier - is essential for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The brain is the most highly protected organ in the human body. It has a layer of cells covering it that act as a relentless guard that regulates the passage and exchange of nutrients and molecules between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma, the nervous tissue in the brain. This barrier - the so-called blood-brain barrier - is essential for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

When Michael Gershon called the digestive system "the second brain" in his 1999 book, it was because scientists were beginning to realize that the gut and the brain in humans were engaged in constant conversation. Emeran Mayer, a leading researcher in the field of the gut-brain axis, affirms that this connection has been known for years. "Gut-brain communication is firmly…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When Michael Gershon called the digestive system "the second brain" in his 1999 book, it was because scientists were beginning to realize that the gut and the brain in humans were engaged in constant conversation. Emeran Mayer, a leading researcher in the field of the gut-brain axis, affirms that this connection has been known for years. "Gut-brain communication is firmly…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Many living organisms have circadian rhythms—biological processes that oscillate in a pattern following a roughly 24-hour cycle. In humans, researchers have observed the rhythmic expression of 'clock genes', resulting in molecular changes in multiple body tissues; the entire process is coordinated by 'pacemakers' such as the brain's hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. In addition to regulating physiological processes, the host's circadian clock…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Many living organisms have circadian rhythms—biological processes that oscillate in a pattern following a roughly 24-hour cycle. In humans, researchers have observed the rhythmic expression of 'clock genes', resulting in molecular changes in multiple body tissues; the entire process is coordinated by 'pacemakers' such as the brain's hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. In addition to regulating physiological processes, the host's circadian clock…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A recent study, led by Dr. Peng Xie from the Chongqing Medical University in China, has demonstrated that intestinal ‘dysbiosis’ may have a causal role in the development of depressive-like behaviours in mice through altering host metabolism.   It has been previously described that the gut microbiota may be an environmental factor that can modulate brain physiology through the microbiota-gut-brain…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent study, led by Dr. Peng Xie from the Chongqing Medical University in China, has demonstrated that intestinal ‘dysbiosis’ may have a causal role in the development of depressive-like behaviours in mice through altering host metabolism.   It has been previously described that the gut microbiota may be an environmental factor that can modulate brain physiology through the microbiota-gut-brain…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent review, published by Julia Schwartzman and Edward Ruby from the Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology at University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA), argues that chemical and physical stresses should be considered a normal attribute of the host symbiotic milieu. Their arguments are as follows. Microorganisms appeared on the Earth as early as 3.4 billion years ago, and as humans…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent review, published by Julia Schwartzman and Edward Ruby from the Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology at University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA), argues that chemical and physical stresses should be considered a normal attribute of the host symbiotic milieu. Their arguments are as follows. Microorganisms appeared on the Earth as early as 3.4 billion years ago, and as humans…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although it is well documented that gut microbiota may shape brain function and development, little is known about its impact on the outcome of acute brain injury. A recent study, led by Dr. Josef Anrather, an associate professor of neuroscience at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York (USA), has found that the commensal gut microbiota could influence the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although it is well documented that gut microbiota may shape brain function and development, little is known about its impact on the outcome of acute brain injury. A recent study, led by Dr. Josef Anrather, an associate professor of neuroscience at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York (USA), has found that the commensal gut microbiota could influence the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados