Gut Brain Axis

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Research & Practice

Microglia are important immune system cells in the brain that can destroy target cells. They are important for proper brain development and associated with neuropsychiatric or neurological disorders in humans. A team of researchers set out to address this question: what controls microglia maturation and function under normal conditions? They found that host microbiota contributed substantially to microglia homeostasis. Germ-free…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Microglia are important immune system cells in the brain that can destroy target cells. They are important for proper brain development and associated with neuropsychiatric or neurological disorders in humans. A team of researchers set out to address this question: what controls microglia maturation and function under normal conditions? They found that host microbiota contributed substantially to microglia homeostasis. Germ-free…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

90% of the human body's serotonin (also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine, or 5-HT) is produced by enterochromaffin (EC) cells in the gut and is used for enteric functions. A paper in Cell by Yano and colleagues demonstrates that the microbiota play a vital role in regulating serotonin in the host. In the gut microbiota of mice and humans, spore-forming bacteria promote…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

90% of the human body's serotonin (also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine, or 5-HT) is produced by enterochromaffin (EC) cells in the gut and is used for enteric functions. A paper in Cell by Yano and colleagues demonstrates that the microbiota play a vital role in regulating serotonin in the host. In the gut microbiota of mice and humans, spore-forming bacteria promote…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dr. Premysl Bercik is a gastroenterologist, researcher, and Associate Professor in the Division of Gastroenterology at McMaster University in Canada. He serves as the GMFH expert on the gut-brain axis. Bercik recently presented his work at Experimental Biology (EB) 2015 and at the International Human Microbiome Congress (IHMC) 2015. In Boston, he sat down with GMFH editors to discuss how…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Premysl Bercik is a gastroenterologist, researcher, and Associate Professor in the Division of Gastroenterology at McMaster University in Canada. He serves as the GMFH expert on the gut-brain axis. Bercik recently presented his work at Experimental Biology (EB) 2015 and at the International Human Microbiome Congress (IHMC) 2015. In Boston, he sat down with GMFH editors to discuss how…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Recently, an (open-access) article co-authored with colleagues Hans Törnblom & Magnus Simrén appeared in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Crosstalk at the mucosal border: importance of the gut microenvironment in IBS. This review addresses the complex pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We discuss four factors that may be involved: Gut microbiota composition Increased intestinal permeability Imbalance in the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recently, an (open-access) article co-authored with colleagues Hans Törnblom & Magnus Simrén appeared in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Crosstalk at the mucosal border: importance of the gut microenvironment in IBS. This review addresses the complex pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We discuss four factors that may be involved: Gut microbiota composition Increased intestinal permeability Imbalance in the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

From cradle to grave, our gut is our most important physiological connection to the microbiome.  While significant progress has been made to understand the development of this complex community early in life, it is only recently that researchers have begun to understand its deterioration later in life.  Scientists are now recognizing the important influence the microbiome may have on the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

From cradle to grave, our gut is our most important physiological connection to the microbiome.  While significant progress has been made to understand the development of this complex community early in life, it is only recently that researchers have begun to understand its deterioration later in life.  Scientists are now recognizing the important influence the microbiome may have on the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team