Gut Brain Axis

News Watch

It is well known that brain levels of serotonin (also called the “happy hormone” as it is the major chemical involved in the regulation of mood and emotion) are altered in times of anxiety, depression, stress or excitement. However, a recent study has shown that early gut bacteria can be linked to happiness in adulthood. In other words, the presence…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is well known that brain levels of serotonin (also called the “happy hormone” as it is the major chemical involved in the regulation of mood and emotion) are altered in times of anxiety, depression, stress or excitement. However, a recent study has shown that early gut bacteria can be linked to happiness in adulthood. In other words, the presence…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Recent advances in research have described the importance of gut microbiota in influencing interactions between the central and the enteric nervous systems. These brain-gut interactions appear to be bidirectional by means of neural, endocrine, immune, and humoral signals. Most of the data have been acquired using rodents (mice or rats) and pigs.   Evidence of microbiota-mental health interactions comes from…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent advances in research have described the importance of gut microbiota in influencing interactions between the central and the enteric nervous systems. These brain-gut interactions appear to be bidirectional by means of neural, endocrine, immune, and humoral signals. Most of the data have been acquired using rodents (mice or rats) and pigs.   Evidence of microbiota-mental health interactions comes from…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

When Michael Gershon called the digestive system "the second brain" in his 1999 book, it was because scientists were beginning to realize that the gut and the brain in humans were engaged in constant conversation. Emeran Mayer, a leading researcher in the field of the gut-brain axis, affirms that this connection has been known for years. "Gut-brain communication is firmly…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When Michael Gershon called the digestive system "the second brain" in his 1999 book, it was because scientists were beginning to realize that the gut and the brain in humans were engaged in constant conversation. Emeran Mayer, a leading researcher in the field of the gut-brain axis, affirms that this connection has been known for years. "Gut-brain communication is firmly…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Many living organisms have circadian rhythms—biological processes that oscillate in a pattern following a roughly 24-hour cycle. In humans, researchers have observed the rhythmic expression of 'clock genes', resulting in molecular changes in multiple body tissues; the entire process is coordinated by 'pacemakers' such as the brain's hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. In addition to regulating physiological processes, the host's circadian clock…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Many living organisms have circadian rhythms—biological processes that oscillate in a pattern following a roughly 24-hour cycle. In humans, researchers have observed the rhythmic expression of 'clock genes', resulting in molecular changes in multiple body tissues; the entire process is coordinated by 'pacemakers' such as the brain's hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. In addition to regulating physiological processes, the host's circadian clock…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A recent study, led by Dr. Peng Xie from the Chongqing Medical University in China, has demonstrated that intestinal ‘dysbiosis’ may have a causal role in the development of depressive-like behaviours in mice through altering host metabolism.   It has been previously described that the gut microbiota may be an environmental factor that can modulate brain physiology through the microbiota-gut-brain…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent study, led by Dr. Peng Xie from the Chongqing Medical University in China, has demonstrated that intestinal ‘dysbiosis’ may have a causal role in the development of depressive-like behaviours in mice through altering host metabolism.   It has been previously described that the gut microbiota may be an environmental factor that can modulate brain physiology through the microbiota-gut-brain…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent review, published by Julia Schwartzman and Edward Ruby from the Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology at University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA), argues that chemical and physical stresses should be considered a normal attribute of the host symbiotic milieu. Their arguments are as follows. Microorganisms appeared on the Earth as early as 3.4 billion years ago, and as humans…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent review, published by Julia Schwartzman and Edward Ruby from the Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology at University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA), argues that chemical and physical stresses should be considered a normal attribute of the host symbiotic milieu. Their arguments are as follows. Microorganisms appeared on the Earth as early as 3.4 billion years ago, and as humans…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados