Gut Brain Axis

News Watch

At first, he noticed a twitch in one of his fingers. “It’s nothing”, he thought. But as time went on, the movements did not stop. So Michael J Fox, who played Marty McFly in the popular Back to the Future film saga, decided to go to the doctor, who, unfortunately, diagnosed him with Parkinson’s disease in 1991. At that time,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

At first, he noticed a twitch in one of his fingers. “It’s nothing”, he thought. But as time went on, the movements did not stop. So Michael J Fox, who played Marty McFly in the popular Back to the Future film saga, decided to go to the doctor, who, unfortunately, diagnosed him with Parkinson’s disease in 1991. At that time,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Most of us sometimes try to calm our nerves by binge-eating. When it is occasional, it may lead to some extra weight or guilty feelings. When it is a regular habit, however, it is clinically considered an eating disorder. In fact, more than 8% of the population experiences some kind of eating disorder at some point in their lives (US…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Most of us sometimes try to calm our nerves by binge-eating. When it is occasional, it may lead to some extra weight or guilty feelings. When it is a regular habit, however, it is clinically considered an eating disorder. In fact, more than 8% of the population experiences some kind of eating disorder at some point in their lives (US…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Some months ago, California welcomed the TEDxCaltech: The Brain conference, where experts from different areas discussed a range of issues about the brain and the future of neuroscience. At one of the sessions, Elaine Hsiao, PhD in Microbiology from the California Institute of Technology, discussed the relationship between the microbiota, the human brain and behaviour. During her speech, Dr. Hsiao presented…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Some months ago, California welcomed the TEDxCaltech: The Brain conference, where experts from different areas discussed a range of issues about the brain and the future of neuroscience. At one of the sessions, Elaine Hsiao, PhD in Microbiology from the California Institute of Technology, discussed the relationship between the microbiota, the human brain and behaviour. During her speech, Dr. Hsiao presented…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is often said that “we are what we eat” and, as research into the relationship between diet and the gut microbiota progresses, the expression becomes even more meaningful. It is well known that a diet rich in live cultures like probiotics may change the composition of the gut flora. Furthermore, consuming this kind of products may also influence brain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is often said that “we are what we eat” and, as research into the relationship between diet and the gut microbiota progresses, the expression becomes even more meaningful. It is well known that a diet rich in live cultures like probiotics may change the composition of the gut flora. Furthermore, consuming this kind of products may also influence brain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is well known that brain levels of serotonin (also called the “happy hormone” as it is the major chemical involved in the regulation of mood and emotion) are altered in times of anxiety, depression, stress or excitement. However, a recent study has shown that early gut bacteria can be linked to happiness in adulthood. In other words, the presence…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is well known that brain levels of serotonin (also called the “happy hormone” as it is the major chemical involved in the regulation of mood and emotion) are altered in times of anxiety, depression, stress or excitement. However, a recent study has shown that early gut bacteria can be linked to happiness in adulthood. In other words, the presence…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

A recent review, published by postdoctoral researcher Dr. Eldin Jasarevic from the Department of Animal Biology in the University of Pennsylvania, argues that sex differences influence the development, maturation, and maintenance of the gut microbiome-brain axis throughout the lifespan.   The gut-brain axis (GBA) involves bidirectional communication between the central and enteric nervous systems, which facilitates the integration of peripheral…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent review, published by postdoctoral researcher Dr. Eldin Jasarevic from the Department of Animal Biology in the University of Pennsylvania, argues that sex differences influence the development, maturation, and maintenance of the gut microbiome-brain axis throughout the lifespan.   The gut-brain axis (GBA) involves bidirectional communication between the central and enteric nervous systems, which facilitates the integration of peripheral…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent study by Andrew Moeller and colleagues has revealed that social interactions can raise microbial diversity in the gut microbiome across chimpanzee generations. The study monitored the effect of chimpanzee sociability on gut microbiome diversity over an eight-year period. Faecal samples were collected and sequenced from 40 Kasakela chimpanzees in Gombe, Tanzania, at different stages of life. In addition,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent study by Andrew Moeller and colleagues has revealed that social interactions can raise microbial diversity in the gut microbiome across chimpanzee generations. The study monitored the effect of chimpanzee sociability on gut microbiome diversity over an eight-year period. Faecal samples were collected and sequenced from 40 Kasakela chimpanzees in Gombe, Tanzania, at different stages of life. In addition,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It is increasingly clear that brain processing is influenced by the gastrointestinal microbiota; study of the gut-brain axis has shown evidence that gut bacteria interact with the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system. Good brain function depends on neuromediators -- that is, substances that carry messages between neurons, or from a neuron to another type of cell. Could an…

Boris Shenderov
Dr. Boris Shenderov is a professor of microbiology who conducts research at the G.N. Gabrichevsky Moscow Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology. He has authored more than 500 scientific papers and abstracts throughout his career. To receive a pdf version of this article, contact Prof. B. A. Shenderov (shenderof@yandex.ru) or Prof. O. Alexander (aoleskin@rambler.ru).

It is increasingly clear that brain processing is influenced by the gastrointestinal microbiota; study of the gut-brain axis has shown evidence that gut bacteria interact with the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system. Good brain function depends on neuromediators -- that is, substances that carry messages between neurons, or from a neuron to another type of cell. Could an…

Boris Shenderov
Dr. Boris Shenderov is a professor of microbiology who conducts research at the G.N. Gabrichevsky Moscow Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology. He has authored more than 500 scientific papers and abstracts throughout his career. To receive a pdf version of this article, contact Prof. B. A. Shenderov (shenderof@yandex.ru) or Prof. O. Alexander (aoleskin@rambler.ru).

How might microorganisms move from one part of the body to another? Let's begin with the womb, where the concept of fetal colonization has rapidly gained acceptance, indicated by meconium and placental microbe studies. A new stool study reveals virus populations are dynamic in healthy infants. The infant virome is most diverse early in life, then bacteria flourish as viral…

Keith Bell
Keith Bell is a citizen scientist of Sanitation Circle and 25 year veteran of the recycling industry with interest in sanitation and health. During the 1980s, he was a UNICEF radio spokesperson in Chicago for the annual release of State of the World's Children Report. He’s particularly interested in gut-brain connection including gut-origin of seizure, underdiagnosed in epilepsy. Sanitation is Sanity poster Contact author: kbellrpi@gmail.com

How might microorganisms move from one part of the body to another? Let's begin with the womb, where the concept of fetal colonization has rapidly gained acceptance, indicated by meconium and placental microbe studies. A new stool study reveals virus populations are dynamic in healthy infants. The infant virome is most diverse early in life, then bacteria flourish as viral…

Keith Bell
Keith Bell is a citizen scientist of Sanitation Circle and 25 year veteran of the recycling industry with interest in sanitation and health. During the 1980s, he was a UNICEF radio spokesperson in Chicago for the annual release of State of the World's Children Report. He’s particularly interested in gut-brain connection including gut-origin of seizure, underdiagnosed in epilepsy. Sanitation is Sanity poster Contact author: kbellrpi@gmail.com

This Chinese study aimed to characterize the gut microbiota of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD): one group of patients with acute MDD (who scored high on a depression scale, indicating clinically significant depression), called 'active-MDD', and a second group of patients with a history of MDD who had responded to treatment (achieving a 50% reduction in depression scale scores…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

This Chinese study aimed to characterize the gut microbiota of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD): one group of patients with acute MDD (who scored high on a depression scale, indicating clinically significant depression), called 'active-MDD', and a second group of patients with a history of MDD who had responded to treatment (achieving a 50% reduction in depression scale scores…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.