Digestive Health

News Watch

It is clear that the gut plays an important role in health. Beyond digestion and absorption of nutrients, the intestine acts as a barrier and a filter, selecting for the good and eliminating the bad. Recent research has shown the importance of the gut microbiota for gut health, and diet remains one of the most powerful ways to influence this…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

It is clear that the gut plays an important role in health. Beyond digestion and absorption of nutrients, the intestine acts as a barrier and a filter, selecting for the good and eliminating the bad. Recent research has shown the importance of the gut microbiota for gut health, and diet remains one of the most powerful ways to influence this…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Ask your grandparents. It is likely that when they were children, they probably had never heard about anyone being allergic to milk or to peanuts. And having asthma was almost incidental. And what about now? One can bet for sure you know people with asthma or atopic dermatitis. Allergic diseases are more and more on the rise and indeed they…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Ask your grandparents. It is likely that when they were children, they probably had never heard about anyone being allergic to milk or to peanuts. And having asthma was almost incidental. And what about now? One can bet for sure you know people with asthma or atopic dermatitis. Allergic diseases are more and more on the rise and indeed they…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The intestinal barrier is the first line of defense against pathogens and antigens in the gut and it encompasses both physical and chemical properties. However, little is known about its critical function for maintaining health and how barrier function is influenced by the microbiota under healthy conditions or in physiological states. Have a look at our new Gut Microbiota for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The intestinal barrier is the first line of defense against pathogens and antigens in the gut and it encompasses both physical and chemical properties. However, little is known about its critical function for maintaining health and how barrier function is influenced by the microbiota under healthy conditions or in physiological states. Have a look at our new Gut Microbiota for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

With 2019 just around the corner, we have taken a moment to look back over the year gone by and consider how much great progress was made in gut microbiota research in 2018. With more than 50 articles published on our platform over the past 12 months discussing these achievements and outcomes, it now gives the GMFH publishing team great…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

With 2019 just around the corner, we have taken a moment to look back over the year gone by and consider how much great progress was made in gut microbiota research in 2018. With more than 50 articles published on our platform over the past 12 months discussing these achievements and outcomes, it now gives the GMFH publishing team great…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Having a food sensitivity is life-altering. Avoiding a particular food or food component can be challenging and avoidance is currently our primary treatment option for this kind of condition. Given that one fifth of the population will be affected by food sensitivity in their lifetime, discovering alternatives to help manage them is critical. Food sensitivities have been increasing at a…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

Having a food sensitivity is life-altering. Avoiding a particular food or food component can be challenging and avoidance is currently our primary treatment option for this kind of condition. Given that one fifth of the population will be affected by food sensitivity in their lifetime, discovering alternatives to help manage them is critical. Food sensitivities have been increasing at a…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

Research & Practice

The fact some people respond to a drug treatment while for others the same treatment is totally ineffective may depend on our gut microbiota. In other words, after a drug is administered orally, it could either be absorbed into the bloodstream and metabolized by the liver, or it remains in the intestine where it can be metabolized by the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The fact some people respond to a drug treatment while for others the same treatment is totally ineffective may depend on our gut microbiota. In other words, after a drug is administered orally, it could either be absorbed into the bloodstream and metabolized by the liver, or it remains in the intestine where it can be metabolized by the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Imbalances in the small intestinal microbiome can drive clinical consequences in the form of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), characterized by higher numbers of bacteria and a distribution more commonly associated with the colon. In recent times, SIBO has been recognized as a frequent cause of common gastrointestinal conditions that share risk factors such as maldigestion and malabsorption. Methods used…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Imbalances in the small intestinal microbiome can drive clinical consequences in the form of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), characterized by higher numbers of bacteria and a distribution more commonly associated with the colon. In recent times, SIBO has been recognized as a frequent cause of common gastrointestinal conditions that share risk factors such as maldigestion and malabsorption. Methods used…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The functional metagenomic screening of the human gut microbiome gives us a better understanding of how microbial genes shape almost all aspects of physiology. Although an important number of microbial species have yet to be characterized, next generation approaches have increased the number of gut microorganism genomes that can be mapped. For instance, analysis of the gut metagenome has provided…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.