Digestive Health

News Watch

Having a food sensitivity is life-altering. Avoiding a particular food or food component can be challenging and avoidance is currently our primary treatment option for this kind of condition. Given that one fifth of the population will be affected by food sensitivity in their lifetime, discovering alternatives to help manage them is critical. Food sensitivities have been increasing at a…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

Having a food sensitivity is life-altering. Avoiding a particular food or food component can be challenging and avoidance is currently our primary treatment option for this kind of condition. Given that one fifth of the population will be affected by food sensitivity in their lifetime, discovering alternatives to help manage them is critical. Food sensitivities have been increasing at a…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

Can you tell the difference between food sensitivity and food intolerance? Both are garnering increasing media attention that can sometimes cause confusion, with inaccurate information possibly leading to self-diagnosis and unnecessary dietary restrictions. To shed some light on the topic, we have created an infographic highlighting the differences between the two conditions. Have a look at our new Gut Microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Can you tell the difference between food sensitivity and food intolerance? Both are garnering increasing media attention that can sometimes cause confusion, with inaccurate information possibly leading to self-diagnosis and unnecessary dietary restrictions. To shed some light on the topic, we have created an infographic highlighting the differences between the two conditions. Have a look at our new Gut Microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The role of dietitians is key in translating scientific evidence about gut health into practice. As Andrea Hardy, a Registered Dietitian from Calgary (Canada), explains in the second part of this interview, recorded in Rome during the 7th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, “There is a lot of misinformation out there, so we have to be ready to approach…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The role of dietitians is key in translating scientific evidence about gut health into practice. As Andrea Hardy, a Registered Dietitian from Calgary (Canada), explains in the second part of this interview, recorded in Rome during the 7th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, “There is a lot of misinformation out there, so we have to be ready to approach…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Giulia Enders is an MD working at the Israelite Hospital (Israelitisches Krankenhaus, IK) and author of the bestseller ‘Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Underrated Organ’. Enders explains how and why she became fascinated by the functions and the importance of the human gastrointestinal tract, including the gut microbiota, in this talk held in TEDxDanubia, Budapest (Hungary), in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Giulia Enders is an MD working at the Israelite Hospital (Israelitisches Krankenhaus, IK) and author of the bestseller ‘Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Underrated Organ’. Enders explains how and why she became fascinated by the functions and the importance of the human gastrointestinal tract, including the gut microbiota, in this talk held in TEDxDanubia, Budapest (Hungary), in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is known, as we have already explained in this blog, that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis, are linked to an imbalance in gut microbiota, known as dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the reason explaining this connection remains a mystery for scientists. It is also known from previous research that oral bacteria do not tend to live in…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

It is known, as we have already explained in this blog, that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis, are linked to an imbalance in gut microbiota, known as dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the reason explaining this connection remains a mystery for scientists. It is also known from previous research that oral bacteria do not tend to live in…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Research & Practice

Recent research has involved genetics, altered mucosal immune responses, environmental factors and the gut microbiome as major players in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that some patients do not respond to conventional treatments, scientists are currently exploring new gut microbiome-targeted therapeutic approaches to improve disease course. A new study, led by Dr. Ramnik Joseph Xavier from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has involved genetics, altered mucosal immune responses, environmental factors and the gut microbiome as major players in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that some patients do not respond to conventional treatments, scientists are currently exploring new gut microbiome-targeted therapeutic approaches to improve disease course. A new study, led by Dr. Ramnik Joseph Xavier from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Traditionally, the diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharide and polyol (FODMAP) - best as a 2-phased intervention, with strict reduction of all slowly absorbed or indigestible carbohydrates (i.e., FODMAPs) followed by reintroduction of some of them according to tolerance - has been widely used for overall gastrointestinal symptom relief in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, decreasing…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

Traditionally, the diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharide and polyol (FODMAP) - best as a 2-phased intervention, with strict reduction of all slowly absorbed or indigestible carbohydrates (i.e., FODMAPs) followed by reintroduction of some of them according to tolerance - has been widely used for overall gastrointestinal symptom relief in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, decreasing…

Andrea Hardy
Registered Dietitian, Andrea Hardy from Calgary, Canada specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and the gut microbiome. She is recognized as Canada’s gut health dietitian – educating health care professionals and the public on the pivotal role nutrition plays in gut health. You can find her at Ignite Nutrition, or on Twitter (@AndreaHardyRD).

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Mutations that lead to an impairment of tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) function or/and expression -  a gene that encodes an epigenetic modifier enzyme - have been related to the development of haematopoietic malignancies in both mice and humans. According to a new study in Nature by Marlies Meisel and Reinhard Hinterleitner from the University of Chicago and collaborators, gut…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Mutations that lead to an impairment of tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (Tet2) function or/and expression -  a gene that encodes an epigenetic modifier enzyme - have been related to the development of haematopoietic malignancies in both mice and humans. According to a new study in Nature by Marlies Meisel and Reinhard Hinterleitner from the University of Chicago and collaborators, gut…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

An imbalance in gut microbial communities has been associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and research aimed at elucidating the contribution of the microbiota to inflammatory diseases has primarily focused on bacteria. Subsequent and ongoing research has characterized the fungal microbiota (called mycobiome) in patients with IBD. However, even though bacterial and fungal microbiota might be altered in IBD patients,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

An imbalance in gut microbial communities has been associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and research aimed at elucidating the contribution of the microbiota to inflammatory diseases has primarily focused on bacteria. Subsequent and ongoing research has characterized the fungal microbiota (called mycobiome) in patients with IBD. However, even though bacterial and fungal microbiota might be altered in IBD patients,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados