Category : Research & Practice

Studies exploring the neonatal microbiome during early life have been performed mainly in the hospital setting, with both mode of delivery and antibiotics having the most profound impact on the microbiome. However, the development of the neonatal microbiome in the absence of routine hospital interventions during delivery has not yet been studied. A new study, led by Prof. Maria Gloria…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Studies exploring the neonatal microbiome during early life have been performed mainly in the hospital setting, with both mode of delivery and antibiotics having the most profound impact on the microbiome. However, the development of the neonatal microbiome in the absence of routine hospital interventions during delivery has not yet been studied. A new study, led by Prof. Maria Gloria…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The use of antibiotics has long been related to a perturbation of the composition and functions of commensal bacterial communities. Some bacteria die in response to antibiotics while gut microbes that harbor antibiotic resistance genes survive. However, little is known regarding the impact of antibiotics on the eradication and recovery of gut microorganisms. A new study, led by Prof. Oluf…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The use of antibiotics has long been related to a perturbation of the composition and functions of commensal bacterial communities. Some bacteria die in response to antibiotics while gut microbes that harbor antibiotic resistance genes survive. However, little is known regarding the impact of antibiotics on the eradication and recovery of gut microorganisms. A new study, led by Prof. Oluf…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The composition of the human gut microbiome and its relationship with diseases has been widely explored (for instance, in the MetaHIT project and the Human Microbiome Project). However, the extent to which gut species interact and shape gut microbiome composition dynamics is unknown. A new study, led by Dr. Jeroen Raes from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at KU…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The composition of the human gut microbiome and its relationship with diseases has been widely explored (for instance, in the MetaHIT project and the Human Microbiome Project). However, the extent to which gut species interact and shape gut microbiome composition dynamics is unknown. A new study, led by Dr. Jeroen Raes from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at KU…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Considering that diet is—together with medication—one of the major influencing factors with regards to gut microbiota composition, research is now focusing on how dietary nutrients may affect gut microbial communities. Specifically, an association was previously found between essential omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and gut microbiome diversity in healthy elderly people. However, evidence from randomized trials assessing the effect…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Considering that diet is—together with medication—one of the major influencing factors with regards to gut microbiota composition, research is now focusing on how dietary nutrients may affect gut microbial communities. Specifically, an association was previously found between essential omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and gut microbiome diversity in healthy elderly people. However, evidence from randomized trials assessing the effect…

Stéphane Schneider
Professor Stéphane Schneider heads the Nutritional Support Unit in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition Department Archet University Hospital in Nice (France). He is also head of the Nice University Hospital’s food-nutrition liaison committee. Dr. Schneider is vice-president of the French-Speaking Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP), and chairs the Educational and Clinical Practice Committee of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Three years after receiving his M.D. in Gastroenterology from the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, he became an assistant Professor and later a full Professor of Nutrition. He is also certified by the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He obtained a Master of Science from the University of Paris VII, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University Paul Cezanne, as well as a CME Diploma from Harvard Medical School. His main research interests are intestinal failure and the effects of aging and chronic diseases on nutritional status. He has published 188 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with an h index of 37. His goal is to help understand better the role of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as the effects of different forms of bacteriotherapy, in digestive and non-digestive disorders featuring dysbiosis.

Recent research has involved genetics, altered mucosal immune responses, environmental factors and the gut microbiome as major players in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that some patients do not respond to conventional treatments, scientists are currently exploring new gut microbiome-targeted therapeutic approaches to improve disease course. A new study, led by Dr. Ramnik Joseph Xavier from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has involved genetics, altered mucosal immune responses, environmental factors and the gut microbiome as major players in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that some patients do not respond to conventional treatments, scientists are currently exploring new gut microbiome-targeted therapeutic approaches to improve disease course. A new study, led by Dr. Ramnik Joseph Xavier from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has long been known that the gut communicates with the brain via different pathways that include neuronal activation, the release of hormones and immune signals. Enteroendocrine cells (EECs)—scattered along the gastrointestinal tract between absorptive enterocytes—are involved in sensing luminal nutrients and bacteria and communicating this indirectly to the brain via the release of gut hormones (e.g. cholecystokinin). However, the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has long been known that the gut communicates with the brain via different pathways that include neuronal activation, the release of hormones and immune signals. Enteroendocrine cells (EECs)—scattered along the gastrointestinal tract between absorptive enterocytes—are involved in sensing luminal nutrients and bacteria and communicating this indirectly to the brain via the release of gut hormones (e.g. cholecystokinin). However, the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Western diets high in fats and sugars, modern lifestyles with stress and sedentarism and the indiscriminate use of antibiotics together with other frequently prescribed drugs -such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors- are major drivers of changes in microbiota composition and gut barrier disruption. (Dr. Maria Rescigno) The GMFH publishing team is pleased to share a new summary…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Consuming whole foods rich in natural fibers confers an array of health benefits. Unlike the insoluble fibers that pass through the digestive system unchanged, soluble fibers such as inulin and pectin are fermented by the bacteria found within the gut. Fermentation generates essential nutrients for the survival and growth of these gut bacteria; moreover, the production of gut metabolites (such…

Researchers from the Univ. of Toledo-Microbiome Consortium
Dr. Vishal Singh (left), Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Fellow, and Dr. Matam Vijay-Kumar (right), Associate Professor at the Dept. of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The University of Toledo, OH, USA. The current and future research goals of this group is directed toward preclinical studies that can be used translationally to develop dietary fiber-based therapies for liver diseases and intestinal inflammation. Drs. Singh and Vijay-Kumar envision that not all fibers are created equally, nor will they be fermented uniformly by the gut bacteria. Dr. Singh has published more than 40 research papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and serves as a reviewer for many international journals. Dr. Vijay-Kumar has published more than 70 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals. He is Director of the University of Toledo-Microbiome Consortium (UT-MiCo) and serving as editor and reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Consuming whole foods rich in natural fibers confers an array of health benefits. Unlike the insoluble fibers that pass through the digestive system unchanged, soluble fibers such as inulin and pectin are fermented by the bacteria found within the gut. Fermentation generates essential nutrients for the survival and growth of these gut bacteria; moreover, the production of gut metabolites (such…

Researchers from the Univ. of Toledo-Microbiome Consortium
Dr. Vishal Singh (left), Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Fellow, and Dr. Matam Vijay-Kumar (right), Associate Professor at the Dept. of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The University of Toledo, OH, USA. The current and future research goals of this group is directed toward preclinical studies that can be used translationally to develop dietary fiber-based therapies for liver diseases and intestinal inflammation. Drs. Singh and Vijay-Kumar envision that not all fibers are created equally, nor will they be fermented uniformly by the gut bacteria. Dr. Singh has published more than 40 research papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and serves as a reviewer for many international journals. Dr. Vijay-Kumar has published more than 70 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals. He is Director of the University of Toledo-Microbiome Consortium (UT-MiCo) and serving as editor and reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

This post has been written by Guillermo Mena-Sanchez and co-authored by Nancy Babio and Jordi Salas-Salvadó, from published article Mena-Sánchez G, Babio N, Martínez-González MÁ, et al. Fermented dairy products, diet quality, and cardio-metabolic profile of a Mediterranean cohort at high cardiovascular risk. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2018; 28(10):1002-11. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2018.05.006. Fermented foods have been used for thousands of years and they come…

Researchers from the Human Nutrition Unit (URV)
Researchers from the Human Nutrition Unit (URV). Human Nutrition Unit, University Hospital of Sant Joan de Reus, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Pere Virgili Institute for Health Research, Rovira i Virgili University, Reus, Spain: http://www.nutricio.urv.cat/

This post has been written by Guillermo Mena-Sanchez and co-authored by Nancy Babio and Jordi Salas-Salvadó, from published article Mena-Sánchez G, Babio N, Martínez-González MÁ, et al. Fermented dairy products, diet quality, and cardio-metabolic profile of a Mediterranean cohort at high cardiovascular risk. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2018; 28(10):1002-11. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2018.05.006. Fermented foods have been used for thousands of years and they come…

Researchers from the Human Nutrition Unit (URV)
Researchers from the Human Nutrition Unit (URV). Human Nutrition Unit, University Hospital of Sant Joan de Reus, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Pere Virgili Institute for Health Research, Rovira i Virgili University, Reus, Spain: http://www.nutricio.urv.cat/

Previous research has suggested the gut microbiota's role in the risk of developing metabolic and immune-related disorders later in life. However, no studies have characterized the early-life gut microbiome longitudinally in large populations. Three recent studies shed light on how early-life gut microbiota composition might help identify which children are at risk of developing obesity and type 1 diabetes later…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has suggested the gut microbiota's role in the risk of developing metabolic and immune-related disorders later in life. However, no studies have characterized the early-life gut microbiome longitudinally in large populations. Three recent studies shed light on how early-life gut microbiota composition might help identify which children are at risk of developing obesity and type 1 diabetes later…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados