Category : Research & Practice

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The gut microbiota has become a new player in the onset and development of metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies. One gut bacterium that has been positively associated with leanness in mice and humans is Akkermansia muciniphila, which is naturally present in the gut microbiota of healthy people. In 2017, our research team at UCLouvain (Belgium) found that a pasteurized…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Different environmental factors may shape human gut microbiome variation. Although diet has a major influence on gut microbiome shifts within an individual, at population level, diet contributes little to gut microbiome variation. Although our gut microbiome might contribute to interindividual variability in response to diet, close monitoring of how temporal variation in diet alters gut microbiome composition and stability at…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Different environmental factors may shape human gut microbiome variation. Although diet has a major influence on gut microbiome shifts within an individual, at population level, diet contributes little to gut microbiome variation. Although our gut microbiome might contribute to interindividual variability in response to diet, close monitoring of how temporal variation in diet alters gut microbiome composition and stability at…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The modification of the human gut microbiota’s composition and function is one of the plausible mechanisms that has just recently started being explored in relation to how exercise affects health. Although gut microbiome composition tends to show higher variability under environmental pressures, its diversity functionality tends to remain consistent within and across subjects. In professional athletes, however, little is known…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The modification of the human gut microbiota’s composition and function is one of the plausible mechanisms that has just recently started being explored in relation to how exercise affects health. Although gut microbiome composition tends to show higher variability under environmental pressures, its diversity functionality tends to remain consistent within and across subjects. In professional athletes, however, little is known…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A current challenge in gut microbiome science is that of characterizing the effects of food groups on gut microbial communities instead of focusing on isolated nutrients. Although prebiotics provide health benefits by specifically altering the composition or activity of the gut microbiota, not all dietary fibers are prebiotics and they can benefit gut bacterial groups in different ways. A new…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A current challenge in gut microbiome science is that of characterizing the effects of food groups on gut microbial communities instead of focusing on isolated nutrients. Although prebiotics provide health benefits by specifically altering the composition or activity of the gut microbiota, not all dietary fibers are prebiotics and they can benefit gut bacterial groups in different ways. A new…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The gut microbiome is made up of different taxonomic groups that include bacteria, archaea, microbial eukaryotes (fungi and protozoa) and viruses. Bacteriophages or phages are prokaryotic viruses that represent a substantial fraction of the microorganisms residing in the gut, although their interactions with gut bacteria have remained largely underexplored due to the challenge of characterizing phages encountered in previous research.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The gut microbiome is made up of different taxonomic groups that include bacteria, archaea, microbial eukaryotes (fungi and protozoa) and viruses. Bacteriophages or phages are prokaryotic viruses that represent a substantial fraction of the microorganisms residing in the gut, although their interactions with gut bacteria have remained largely underexplored due to the challenge of characterizing phages encountered in previous research.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Specific dietary modifications have been an area of focus to treat a myriad of diseases such as obesity and IBS. However, the individual response to dietary interventions can vary greatly, partly due to our unique gut microbiota compositions. Personalized nutrition is a promising area of research that aims to predict physiological response to dietary interventions based on a person's gut microbial…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

Specific dietary modifications have been an area of focus to treat a myriad of diseases such as obesity and IBS. However, the individual response to dietary interventions can vary greatly, partly due to our unique gut microbiota compositions. Personalized nutrition is a promising area of research that aims to predict physiological response to dietary interventions based on a person's gut microbial…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

Recurrence of inflammatory lesions is frequent in patients undergoing ileal resection for Crohn’s disease (CD). Although male gender, active smoking at surgery and previous intestinal resection have all been associated with a higher risk of endoscopic post-operative recurrence—as assessed by ileocolonoscopy—there is not a single clinical risk factor that can be used as a perfect predictor of early postoperative endoscopic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recurrence of inflammatory lesions is frequent in patients undergoing ileal resection for Crohn’s disease (CD). Although male gender, active smoking at surgery and previous intestinal resection have all been associated with a higher risk of endoscopic post-operative recurrence—as assessed by ileocolonoscopy—there is not a single clinical risk factor that can be used as a perfect predictor of early postoperative endoscopic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by impairments in social interactions and behavior. It is also accompanied by gastrointestinal dysfunction. According to World Health Organization, one child in 160 worldwide has ASD, which tends to persist into adolescence and adulthood. Beyond genes, environmental factors have been suggested to play a role in the onset of…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by impairments in social interactions and behavior. It is also accompanied by gastrointestinal dysfunction. According to World Health Organization, one child in 160 worldwide has ASD, which tends to persist into adolescence and adulthood. Beyond genes, environmental factors have been suggested to play a role in the onset of…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The Gut Microbiota for Health team is happy to present the replay of the plenary sessions of the Eighth Gut Microbiota for Health Summit – Miami – March 23-24, 2019. http://agau.gastro.org/diweb/catalog/item/id/3353457/q/q=gut*20microbiota&c=504

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Gut Microbiota for Health team is happy to present the replay of the plenary sessions of the Eighth Gut Microbiota for Health Summit – Miami – March 23-24, 2019. http://agau.gastro.org/diweb/catalog/item/id/3353457/q/q=gut*20microbiota&c=504

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team