Category : Food & Ingredients

Prof. Patrice Cani, of Belgium’s Université catholique de Louvain, is involved in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group of the Louvain Drug Research Institute. He investigates the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders: obesity, type 2 diabetes and low-grade inflammation. He aims to uncover the mechanisms involved in the gut-to-liver and in the gut-to-adipose tissue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Prof. Patrice Cani, of Belgium’s Université catholique de Louvain, is involved in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group of the Louvain Drug Research Institute. He investigates the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders: obesity, type 2 diabetes and low-grade inflammation. He aims to uncover the mechanisms involved in the gut-to-liver and in the gut-to-adipose tissue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This basic research sought to better understand how soluble dietary fibers exert their beneficial effect on body weight and glucose control. The researchers show that two short-chain fatty acids, which are produced by fermentation of soluble fiber by gut bacteria, activate intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) gene expression through different, but complementary, mechanisms. One of the mechanisms activates IGN gene expression through a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This basic research sought to better understand how soluble dietary fibers exert their beneficial effect on body weight and glucose control. The researchers show that two short-chain fatty acids, which are produced by fermentation of soluble fiber by gut bacteria, activate intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) gene expression through different, but complementary, mechanisms. One of the mechanisms activates IGN gene expression through a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Filipe De Vadder is a molecular biologist in Gilles Mithieux group and published recently an important article in Cell journal which illustrate how gut microbiota fermentation product could impact neural communication. He accepted for GMFH to give us some highlights. 1) What is the context of this study? Dietary fiber has long been known for its beneficial effects on health,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Filipe De Vadder is a molecular biologist in Gilles Mithieux group and published recently an important article in Cell journal which illustrate how gut microbiota fermentation product could impact neural communication. He accepted for GMFH to give us some highlights. 1) What is the context of this study? Dietary fiber has long been known for its beneficial effects on health,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

The team of Jeffrey Gordon (Ridaura et al. Science 2013) published that the phenotype of obesity (increased adiposity) of an obese twin in a discordant twin pair is transmissible. In other words, they found that mice receiving an obese twin’s fecal microbiota display a greater fat mass than the mice receiving lean twin’s gut microbes. Cohousing is widely used in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The team of Jeffrey Gordon (Ridaura et al. Science 2013) published that the phenotype of obesity (increased adiposity) of an obese twin in a discordant twin pair is transmissible. In other words, they found that mice receiving an obese twin’s fecal microbiota display a greater fat mass than the mice receiving lean twin’s gut microbes. Cohousing is widely used in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Can you tell us a little bit about you and how you got interested in Gut Microbiota?   FL: I was trained as a geneticist. As a PhD student (2000-2003), I worked in a lab that used the Drosophila fly  as a model for research. My scientific questions were on immunity (infection resistance, especially those of bacterial origin) in Bruno…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Can you tell us a little bit about you and how you got interested in Gut Microbiota?   FL: I was trained as a geneticist. As a PhD student (2000-2003), I worked in a lab that used the Drosophila fly  as a model for research. My scientific questions were on immunity (infection resistance, especially those of bacterial origin) in Bruno…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Moderator: Francisco Guarner – Speakers: Karen Scott, Colin Hill   Karen Scott’s presentation was designed as a pedagogical introduction to the notion of prebiotics. She put forward the definition given in Gibson et al 2010:  “Prebiotics are a selectively fermented ingredient that results in specific changes in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota, thus conferring benefit(s) upon host…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Moderator: Francisco Guarner – Speakers: Karen Scott, Colin Hill   Karen Scott’s presentation was designed as a pedagogical introduction to the notion of prebiotics. She put forward the definition given in Gibson et al 2010:  “Prebiotics are a selectively fermented ingredient that results in specific changes in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota, thus conferring benefit(s) upon host…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team