Category : Food & Ingredients

Bacteria in food, including probiotics, are a major environmental source of microbes in the human body. But what happens to the bacteria once they are ingested? Do they have any short- or long-term effects on the body? Derrien and van Hylckama Vlieg recently published a review in Trends in Microbiology, Fate, activity, and impact of ingested bacteria within the human gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Bacteria in food, including probiotics, are a major environmental source of microbes in the human body. But what happens to the bacteria once they are ingested? Do they have any short- or long-term effects on the body? Derrien and van Hylckama Vlieg recently published a review in Trends in Microbiology, Fate, activity, and impact of ingested bacteria within the human gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When treating vulnerable populations with probiotics in research and clinical practice, the quality of probiotic products is important because the stakes are high. In October, 2014, for example, a preterm infant in Connecticut died of gastrointestinal mucormycosis that was caused by a contaminated probiotic product given in hospital. What lessons can clinicians and researchers take away from this situation?  …

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

When treating vulnerable populations with probiotics in research and clinical practice, the quality of probiotic products is important because the stakes are high. In October, 2014, for example, a preterm infant in Connecticut died of gastrointestinal mucormycosis that was caused by a contaminated probiotic product given in hospital. What lessons can clinicians and researchers take away from this situation?  …

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

We are pleased to introduce the first edition of our « Best of » series! In this first issue, you have at your fingertips the best way to get up-to-date on the area of gut microbiota, diet and nutrition. In this document, we’ve compiled a selected group of articles, summaries, and interviews from the last two years on our website,…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

We are pleased to introduce the first edition of our « Best of » series! In this first issue, you have at your fingertips the best way to get up-to-date on the area of gut microbiota, diet and nutrition. In this document, we’ve compiled a selected group of articles, summaries, and interviews from the last two years on our website,…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Dr. W. Allan Walker of Harvard Medical School was the chair of the organizing committee for the 2014 Harvard Probiotics Symposium. He caught up with Gut Microbiota for Health after the conference to give an overview of the event. See our additional coverage of the Harvard Probiotics Symposium here. What is the value of an event like the Harvard Probiotics Symposium?…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. W. Allan Walker of Harvard Medical School was the chair of the organizing committee for the 2014 Harvard Probiotics Symposium. He caught up with Gut Microbiota for Health after the conference to give an overview of the event. See our additional coverage of the Harvard Probiotics Symposium here. What is the value of an event like the Harvard Probiotics Symposium?…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Josef Neu is a neonatologist and pediatrician, as well as an associate professor at the University of Florida. He researches developmental gastroenterology and neonatal nutrition. He sat down with Gut Microbiota for Health at the Harvard Probiotics Symposium 2014, after his presentation: The Perinatal Microbiome: Implications for Health and Disease. What struck you during the Harvard Probiotics Symposium sessions? I…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Josef Neu is a neonatologist and pediatrician, as well as an associate professor at the University of Florida. He researches developmental gastroenterology and neonatal nutrition. He sat down with Gut Microbiota for Health at the Harvard Probiotics Symposium 2014, after his presentation: The Perinatal Microbiome: Implications for Health and Disease. What struck you during the Harvard Probiotics Symposium sessions? I…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In a previous GMFH article, ‘PROBIOTICS’ PART I: A BRANCHING DEFINITION, we covered recent updates to the definition of probiotics as discussed at the October 2013 meeting organized by The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP). Three of the scientific experts on the ISAPP panel – Dr. Francisco Guarner (University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain), Dr. Mary Ellen…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In a previous GMFH article, ‘PROBIOTICS’ PART I: A BRANCHING DEFINITION, we covered recent updates to the definition of probiotics as discussed at the October 2013 meeting organized by The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP). Three of the scientific experts on the ISAPP panel – Dr. Francisco Guarner (University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain), Dr. Mary Ellen…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics have a well-known definition that has been cited for over a decade: ‘Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. Written in a 2001 joint report of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (FAO/WHO), it is a definition that served well at the time,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics have a well-known definition that has been cited for over a decade: ‘Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. Written in a 2001 joint report of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (FAO/WHO), it is a definition that served well at the time,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrick Veiga and MetaHIT colleagues tested how fermented milks product could modulate microbiota. Using a metagenomics approach, they found that the abundance of unknown species increased in the gut when patients took the fermented milk product. Having access to the functional content, authors found that those species had the functional potential to produce butyrate. Patrick Veiga accepted to give us…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrick Veiga and MetaHIT colleagues tested how fermented milks product could modulate microbiota. Using a metagenomics approach, they found that the abundance of unknown species increased in the gut when patients took the fermented milk product. Having access to the functional content, authors found that those species had the functional potential to produce butyrate. Patrick Veiga accepted to give us…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Marion Leclerc is a French microbiologist working at INRA  (the French National Institute for Agricultural Research) Jouy-en-Josas Centre. She spoke with Gut Microbiota for Health about her various areas of research.   What research are you doing on functional characterization of the gut microbiota? I am now [cooperating] with Patricia Lepage... we have different projects where we try to go from known…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Marion Leclerc is a French microbiologist working at INRA  (the French National Institute for Agricultural Research) Jouy-en-Josas Centre. She spoke with Gut Microbiota for Health about her various areas of research.   What research are you doing on functional characterization of the gut microbiota? I am now [cooperating] with Patricia Lepage... we have different projects where we try to go from known…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter