Category : Food & Ingredients

Dr. W. Allan Walker of Harvard Medical School was the chair of the organizing committee for the 2014 Harvard Probiotics Symposium. He caught up with Gut Microbiota for Health after the conference to give an overview of the event. See our additional coverage of the Harvard Probiotics Symposium here. What is the value of an event like the Harvard Probiotics Symposium?…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. W. Allan Walker of Harvard Medical School was the chair of the organizing committee for the 2014 Harvard Probiotics Symposium. He caught up with Gut Microbiota for Health after the conference to give an overview of the event. See our additional coverage of the Harvard Probiotics Symposium here. What is the value of an event like the Harvard Probiotics Symposium?…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Josef Neu is a neonatologist and pediatrician, as well as an associate professor at the University of Florida. He researches developmental gastroenterology and neonatal nutrition. He sat down with Gut Microbiota for Health at the Harvard Probiotics Symposium 2014, after his presentation: The Perinatal Microbiome: Implications for Health and Disease. What struck you during the Harvard Probiotics Symposium sessions? I…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Josef Neu is a neonatologist and pediatrician, as well as an associate professor at the University of Florida. He researches developmental gastroenterology and neonatal nutrition. He sat down with Gut Microbiota for Health at the Harvard Probiotics Symposium 2014, after his presentation: The Perinatal Microbiome: Implications for Health and Disease. What struck you during the Harvard Probiotics Symposium sessions? I…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In a previous GMFH article, ‘PROBIOTICS’ PART I: A BRANCHING DEFINITION, we covered recent updates to the definition of probiotics as discussed at the October 2013 meeting organized by The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP). Three of the scientific experts on the ISAPP panel – Dr. Francisco Guarner (University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain), Dr. Mary Ellen…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In a previous GMFH article, ‘PROBIOTICS’ PART I: A BRANCHING DEFINITION, we covered recent updates to the definition of probiotics as discussed at the October 2013 meeting organized by The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP). Three of the scientific experts on the ISAPP panel – Dr. Francisco Guarner (University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain), Dr. Mary Ellen…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics have a well-known definition that has been cited for over a decade: ‘Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. Written in a 2001 joint report of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (FAO/WHO), it is a definition that served well at the time,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics have a well-known definition that has been cited for over a decade: ‘Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. Written in a 2001 joint report of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (FAO/WHO), it is a definition that served well at the time,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrick Veiga and MetaHIT colleagues tested how fermented milks product could modulate microbiota. Using a metagenomics approach, they found that the abundance of unknown species increased in the gut when patients took the fermented milk product. Having access to the functional content, authors found that those species had the functional potential to produce butyrate. Patrick Veiga accepted to give us…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrick Veiga and MetaHIT colleagues tested how fermented milks product could modulate microbiota. Using a metagenomics approach, they found that the abundance of unknown species increased in the gut when patients took the fermented milk product. Having access to the functional content, authors found that those species had the functional potential to produce butyrate. Patrick Veiga accepted to give us…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Marion Leclerc is a French microbiologist working at INRA  (the French National Institute for Agricultural Research) Jouy-en-Josas Centre. She spoke with Gut Microbiota for Health about her various areas of research.   What research are you doing on functional characterization of the gut microbiota? I am now [cooperating] with Patricia Lepage... we have different projects where we try to go from known…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Marion Leclerc is a French microbiologist working at INRA  (the French National Institute for Agricultural Research) Jouy-en-Josas Centre. She spoke with Gut Microbiota for Health about her various areas of research.   What research are you doing on functional characterization of the gut microbiota? I am now [cooperating] with Patricia Lepage... we have different projects where we try to go from known…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This article is a collaboration of representatives from academia, medicine, and industry who came together at a workshop during the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) held in Cork, Ireland in October, 2012. The goal of the workshop was to assess evidence on the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, focusing specifically on probiotic and prebiotic treatments. Participants hoped…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This article is a collaboration of representatives from academia, medicine, and industry who came together at a workshop during the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) held in Cork, Ireland in October, 2012. The goal of the workshop was to assess evidence on the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, focusing specifically on probiotic and prebiotic treatments. Participants hoped…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter