Category : Food & Ingredients

A recent study lent insight into the role of the microbiota in both diet-related and genetic obesity in humans. This Chinese study, led by Prof. Liping Zhao, Prof. Aihua Yin, and Prof. Huiru Tang, involved 17 children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) -- the most common genetic cause of morbid obesity in children -- and 21 with simple (diet-induced) obesity. The…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A recent study lent insight into the role of the microbiota in both diet-related and genetic obesity in humans. This Chinese study, led by Prof. Liping Zhao, Prof. Aihua Yin, and Prof. Huiru Tang, involved 17 children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) -- the most common genetic cause of morbid obesity in children -- and 21 with simple (diet-induced) obesity. The…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Stephen J.D. O'Keefe is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and a practicing gastroenterologist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His work focuses on 'nutritional gastroenterology' -- in particular, translational research that evaluates physiological and pathophysiological responses to dietary intake. Dr. O'Keefe gave a talk at Experimental Biology 2015 called, "Diet, Microbiota, and Microbial Metabolites in Rural…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Stephen J.D. O'Keefe is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and a practicing gastroenterologist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His work focuses on 'nutritional gastroenterology' -- in particular, translational research that evaluates physiological and pathophysiological responses to dietary intake. Dr. O'Keefe gave a talk at Experimental Biology 2015 called, "Diet, Microbiota, and Microbial Metabolites in Rural…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When Dr. Deanna Gibson began studying patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), she found it strange that scientists knew very little about how diet -- a controllable factor -- could alter gut microbes and gut immune responses. "[In] inflammatory bowel diseases, we know that environment is playing a role. The sheer dramatic rise in the incidence of them cannot be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When Dr. Deanna Gibson began studying patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), she found it strange that scientists knew very little about how diet -- a controllable factor -- could alter gut microbes and gut immune responses. "[In] inflammatory bowel diseases, we know that environment is playing a role. The sheer dramatic rise in the incidence of them cannot be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In this Nature Medicine news article, Roxanne Khamsi reports on research around the world showing the microbiome exerts an influence on the human immune system. If scientists knew how to control the key process of inflammation, they could profoundly influence the course of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, heart disease, and liver disease. Khamsi covers several possibilities on how…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

In this Nature Medicine news article, Roxanne Khamsi reports on research around the world showing the microbiome exerts an influence on the human immune system. If scientists knew how to control the key process of inflammation, they could profoundly influence the course of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, heart disease, and liver disease. Khamsi covers several possibilities on how…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

For Catherine Lozupone, formerly a researcher in the Knight and Gordon labs and now faculty at the University of Colorado, characterizing a 'healthy microbiota' or even a 'healthy diet' is far from straightforward. At Experimental Biology 2015 in March, Lozupone presented her research and brought forward a provocative idea: a healthy microbiota is one that matches your diet. She spoke…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

For Catherine Lozupone, formerly a researcher in the Knight and Gordon labs and now faculty at the University of Colorado, characterizing a 'healthy microbiota' or even a 'healthy diet' is far from straightforward. At Experimental Biology 2015 in March, Lozupone presented her research and brought forward a provocative idea: a healthy microbiota is one that matches your diet. She spoke…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Prebiotics and probiotics are food components that directly target the gut microbiota. This recent human study investigated their effects on gut microbiota and metabolic risk markers in obesity. In this trial, researchers tested the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei, which has been associated with a healthy metabolic profile in previous research. They also tested flaxseed -- composed of 30% dietary fibres, including…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Prebiotics and probiotics are food components that directly target the gut microbiota. This recent human study investigated their effects on gut microbiota and metabolic risk markers in obesity. In this trial, researchers tested the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei, which has been associated with a healthy metabolic profile in previous research. They also tested flaxseed -- composed of 30% dietary fibres, including…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Scientists aren't clear on the exact relationship between the Firmicutes to Bacteroides/Prevotella (F:B) ratio, fecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels, and obesity. This observational human study analyzed 3-day dietary intakes, physical activity levels, body mass index, fecal microbiota, and SCFAs in both lean and overweight/obese research participants (n=94).   They found that diet and physical activity levels were similar between…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Scientists aren't clear on the exact relationship between the Firmicutes to Bacteroides/Prevotella (F:B) ratio, fecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels, and obesity. This observational human study analyzed 3-day dietary intakes, physical activity levels, body mass index, fecal microbiota, and SCFAs in both lean and overweight/obese research participants (n=94).   They found that diet and physical activity levels were similar between…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Do specific microbiota determine levels of specific metabolites? How does the metabolite profile develop during establishment of the microbiome in infants? Can we assess an individual’s physiological state based on gut flora and metabolites? These questions are key to translating scientific findings related to intestinal metabolites in order to bring them to the clinic. The relatively new scientific field of…

Stefan Jellbauer
Stefan Jellbauer is a Field Application Scientist in the Biotech industry. Previously, he was an ORISE fellow at the Food Safety division of the FDA and a Postdoc in Manuela Raffatellu’s lab at University of California, Irvine, where he studied host-pathogen interactions and mucosal immunology. He obtained his PhD in 2010 from Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany.

Do specific microbiota determine levels of specific metabolites? How does the metabolite profile develop during establishment of the microbiome in infants? Can we assess an individual’s physiological state based on gut flora and metabolites? These questions are key to translating scientific findings related to intestinal metabolites in order to bring them to the clinic. The relatively new scientific field of…

Stefan Jellbauer
Stefan Jellbauer is a Field Application Scientist in the Biotech industry. Previously, he was an ORISE fellow at the Food Safety division of the FDA and a Postdoc in Manuela Raffatellu’s lab at University of California, Irvine, where he studied host-pathogen interactions and mucosal immunology. He obtained his PhD in 2010 from Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany.

Microglia are important immune system cells in the brain that can destroy target cells. They are important for proper brain development and associated with neuropsychiatric or neurological disorders in humans. A team of researchers set out to address this question: what controls microglia maturation and function under normal conditions? They found that host microbiota contributed substantially to microglia homeostasis. Germ-free…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Microglia are important immune system cells in the brain that can destroy target cells. They are important for proper brain development and associated with neuropsychiatric or neurological disorders in humans. A team of researchers set out to address this question: what controls microglia maturation and function under normal conditions? They found that host microbiota contributed substantially to microglia homeostasis. Germ-free…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

This interesting and well-balanced review examined how long-term and short-term changes in dietary fibre intake affect the microbiome and metabolome. Greater microbial diversity is associated with long-term diets high in fruit/legume fibre, while beneficial Firmicutes decrease in diets high in fat/sugar and low in fibre. Short-term diets based exclusively on animal products and those high in protein and low in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

This interesting and well-balanced review examined how long-term and short-term changes in dietary fibre intake affect the microbiome and metabolome. Greater microbial diversity is associated with long-term diets high in fruit/legume fibre, while beneficial Firmicutes decrease in diets high in fat/sugar and low in fibre. Short-term diets based exclusively on animal products and those high in protein and low in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.