Category : Diet

For Catherine Lozupone, formerly a researcher in the Knight and Gordon labs and now faculty at the University of Colorado, characterizing a 'healthy microbiota' or even a 'healthy diet' is far from straightforward. At Experimental Biology 2015 in March, Lozupone presented her research and brought forward a provocative idea: a healthy microbiota is one that matches your diet. She spoke…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

For Catherine Lozupone, formerly a researcher in the Knight and Gordon labs and now faculty at the University of Colorado, characterizing a 'healthy microbiota' or even a 'healthy diet' is far from straightforward. At Experimental Biology 2015 in March, Lozupone presented her research and brought forward a provocative idea: a healthy microbiota is one that matches your diet. She spoke…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are complex chronic diseases with rapidly growing prevalence across the world. Human studies have found that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to T2DM; the clearest lifestyle factors are high caloric intake and low physical activity. The mechanisms by which human T2DM arises is still unclear, but obesity, insulin resistance and ß-cell dysfunction…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are complex chronic diseases with rapidly growing prevalence across the world. Human studies have found that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to T2DM; the clearest lifestyle factors are high caloric intake and low physical activity. The mechanisms by which human T2DM arises is still unclear, but obesity, insulin resistance and ß-cell dysfunction…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Amir Zarrinpar (MD, PhD) is a gastroenterologist with UC San Diego Health, and a researcher at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. His mouse research on the role of the gut microbiota in obesity and metabolic disease was presented earlier this year in a short talk at the 2015 Keystone Symposium, Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology. Zarrinpar answered some questions…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Amir Zarrinpar (MD, PhD) is a gastroenterologist with UC San Diego Health, and a researcher at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. His mouse research on the role of the gut microbiota in obesity and metabolic disease was presented earlier this year in a short talk at the 2015 Keystone Symposium, Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology. Zarrinpar answered some questions…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The higher rates of colon cancer in Americans of African origin compared to South Africans are usually attributed to diets containing more animal protein and fat and less fibre. O'Keefe et al. investigated (in a paper published in Nature Communications) the role of fat and fibre in this association by conducting 2-week-long food changes in volunteers from both populations: African-Americans…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The higher rates of colon cancer in Americans of African origin compared to South Africans are usually attributed to diets containing more animal protein and fat and less fibre. O'Keefe et al. investigated (in a paper published in Nature Communications) the role of fat and fibre in this association by conducting 2-week-long food changes in volunteers from both populations: African-Americans…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dr. Liping Zhao, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is at the cutting edge of research on how the gut microbiota influence obesity. Gut Microbiota for Health editors are pleased to bring you a video interview with Dr. Zhao as part of our conference highlights from the 2015 Keystone Symposium, "Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology: The Search for Mechanism". In…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. Liping Zhao, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is at the cutting edge of research on how the gut microbiota influence obesity. Gut Microbiota for Health editors are pleased to bring you a video interview with Dr. Zhao as part of our conference highlights from the 2015 Keystone Symposium, "Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology: The Search for Mechanism". In…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are a heterogenous group, and many report symptoms triggered by diet: most commonly wheat/grains, certain vegetables, milk products, fatty foods, spicy foods, coffee, and alcohol. A review published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology discusses the relationship between symptoms, diet, and microbiota in IBS. Authors summarize evidence on how diet and intestinal microbiota impact…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are a heterogenous group, and many report symptoms triggered by diet: most commonly wheat/grains, certain vegetables, milk products, fatty foods, spicy foods, coffee, and alcohol. A review published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology discusses the relationship between symptoms, diet, and microbiota in IBS. Authors summarize evidence on how diet and intestinal microbiota impact…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This is an update, on a rainy March 31, 2015, live from the 5th Congress of the International Human Microbiome Consortium, held in LuxExpo, Luxembourg. Here we are again, after the Hangzhou meeting 18 months ago, in Europe this time. We are all expecting another nice meeting and indeed the plenary sessions of the afternoon did set the pace nicely. Joe…

Fernando Aspiroz

This is an update, on a rainy March 31, 2015, live from the 5th Congress of the International Human Microbiome Consortium, held in LuxExpo, Luxembourg. Here we are again, after the Hangzhou meeting 18 months ago, in Europe this time. We are all expecting another nice meeting and indeed the plenary sessions of the afternoon did set the pace nicely. Joe…

Fernando Aspiroz

Lora Hooper is a professor in the Department of Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas), and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her lab studies immune mechanisms that prevent bacteria from crossing intestinal barriers and entering host tissues. Hooper sat down to talk with GMFH editors at the Keystone Symposium earlier this month. How…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Lora Hooper is a professor in the Department of Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas), and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her lab studies immune mechanisms that prevent bacteria from crossing intestinal barriers and entering host tissues. Hooper sat down to talk with GMFH editors at the Keystone Symposium earlier this month. How…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.