Category : Diet

This is an update, on a rainy March 31, 2015, live from the 5th Congress of the International Human Microbiome Consortium, held in LuxExpo, Luxembourg. Here we are again, after the Hangzhou meeting 18 months ago, in Europe this time. We are all expecting another nice meeting and indeed the plenary sessions of the afternoon did set the pace nicely. Joe…

Fernando Aspiroz

This is an update, on a rainy March 31, 2015, live from the 5th Congress of the International Human Microbiome Consortium, held in LuxExpo, Luxembourg. Here we are again, after the Hangzhou meeting 18 months ago, in Europe this time. We are all expecting another nice meeting and indeed the plenary sessions of the afternoon did set the pace nicely. Joe…

Fernando Aspiroz

Lora Hooper is a professor in the Department of Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas), and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her lab studies immune mechanisms that prevent bacteria from crossing intestinal barriers and entering host tissues. Hooper sat down to talk with GMFH editors at the Keystone Symposium earlier this month. How…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Lora Hooper is a professor in the Department of Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas), and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her lab studies immune mechanisms that prevent bacteria from crossing intestinal barriers and entering host tissues. Hooper sat down to talk with GMFH editors at the Keystone Symposium earlier this month. How…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Prof. Iradj Sobhani is a physician in the Department of Gastroenterology at Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, and a professor of medicine at University Paris-Est Créteil, in France. He is the director of the interdisciplinary research team Macbeth-EC2M3 (Microbiota and early colon cancer detection by using multimodal molecular markers). He and his co-authors recently published a paper in Molecular Systems Biology called 'Potential of fecal…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Prof. Iradj Sobhani is a physician in the Department of Gastroenterology at Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, and a professor of medicine at University Paris-Est Créteil, in France. He is the director of the interdisciplinary research team Macbeth-EC2M3 (Microbiota and early colon cancer detection by using multimodal molecular markers). He and his co-authors recently published a paper in Molecular Systems Biology called 'Potential of fecal…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

We are pleased to introduce the first edition of our « Best of » series! In this first issue, you have at your fingertips the best way to get up-to-date on the area of gut microbiota, diet and nutrition. In this document, we’ve compiled a selected group of articles, summaries, and interviews from the last two years on our website,…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

We are pleased to introduce the first edition of our « Best of » series! In this first issue, you have at your fingertips the best way to get up-to-date on the area of gut microbiota, diet and nutrition. In this document, we’ve compiled a selected group of articles, summaries, and interviews from the last two years on our website,…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

My name is Demian Herrera and I’m a paediatrician, working right now in private consult and as a teacher for paediatrics for medical students and physiology and biochemistry for odontology students; I have a passion for the intestinal microbiome and its implications, and I am doing some research involving the relationship between diarrhoea and nutrition. I believe, as a paediatrician,…

Demian Herrera
Pediatrician working in private consult, teaching biochemistry and physiology in an introductory manner for odontology students, teaching pediatrics for med students. Researching in the topic of diarrhea and nutrition on children, author and creator of the blog Somos los que comemos, link attached (http://comidaymicrobioma.blogspot.com/), member of CHIFA and representative in Dominican Republic and Senior Contributor of Global Health Trials and working on implementing a regional faculty of GHT in Dominican Republic.

My name is Demian Herrera and I’m a paediatrician, working right now in private consult and as a teacher for paediatrics for medical students and physiology and biochemistry for odontology students; I have a passion for the intestinal microbiome and its implications, and I am doing some research involving the relationship between diarrhoea and nutrition. I believe, as a paediatrician,…

Demian Herrera
Pediatrician working in private consult, teaching biochemistry and physiology in an introductory manner for odontology students, teaching pediatrics for med students. Researching in the topic of diarrhea and nutrition on children, author and creator of the blog Somos los que comemos, link attached (http://comidaymicrobioma.blogspot.com/), member of CHIFA and representative in Dominican Republic and Senior Contributor of Global Health Trials and working on implementing a regional faculty of GHT in Dominican Republic.

In Science Report journal, Zhang and colleagues published a study about Mongolians known to have their own typical lifestyle, notably in terms of dietary habits. Using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing, researchers showed the presence of a phylogenetic core microbiota comprising the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcus, Subdoligranulum and Coprococcus. They have shown that urbanisation may change the composition of their gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In Science Report journal, Zhang and colleagues published a study about Mongolians known to have their own typical lifestyle, notably in terms of dietary habits. Using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing, researchers showed the presence of a phylogenetic core microbiota comprising the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcus, Subdoligranulum and Coprococcus. They have shown that urbanisation may change the composition of their gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team