Category : Diet

When Dr. Deanna Gibson began studying patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), she found it strange that scientists knew very little about how diet -- a controllable factor -- could alter gut microbes and gut immune responses. "[In] inflammatory bowel diseases, we know that environment is playing a role. The sheer dramatic rise in the incidence of them cannot be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When Dr. Deanna Gibson began studying patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), she found it strange that scientists knew very little about how diet -- a controllable factor -- could alter gut microbes and gut immune responses. "[In] inflammatory bowel diseases, we know that environment is playing a role. The sheer dramatic rise in the incidence of them cannot be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has shown that adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who adopt a low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) diet show an improvement in symptoms within 2 days. Would the low FODMAP diet have the same effect in childhood IBS? Does the gut microbiota predict the success of the diet in children who respond to this dietary intervention?…

James Versalovic
Dr. James Versalovic received his M.D. with Honors at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) in 1995 and his Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Biology at BCM in 1994. He pursued clinical pathology/medical microbiology residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He also received postdoctoral research training in the Division of Comparative Medicine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Versalovic joined the medical staff as a clinical pathologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital and served as Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School from 1999-2001. He is board-certified in clinical pathology, molecular genetic pathology, and molecular diagnostics. Dr. Versalovic currently serves as Pathologist-In-Chief, Head of the Department of Pathology, and as member of the Board of Directors at Texas Children’s Hospital. He also serves as Vice Chair of Molecular Pathology and Omics at BCM, and Director of the Texas Children’s Microbiome Center. He holds the Milton J. Finegold endowed chair as Professor of Pathology & Immunology, and Professor of Pediatrics, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. He is Co-Director of the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program at Baylor. He served as Editor-in-Chief of the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and Editor of Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics and Related Strategies. As a Principal Investigator, his primary research interests include the human microbiome, probiotics, medical and molecular microbiology, innate immunity, digestive diseases, and gastrointestinal physiology. His research program has been supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, and Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America. Dr. Versalovic has authored 131 primary manuscripts, 34 book chapters, and 2 patents. He received the Lansky Award as a national leader in pathology under the age of 45 from the College of American Pathologists Foundation. He also received the BioGaia Ivan Casas Probiotics Research Award and the BCM Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Previous research has shown that adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who adopt a low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) diet show an improvement in symptoms within 2 days. Would the low FODMAP diet have the same effect in childhood IBS? Does the gut microbiota predict the success of the diet in children who respond to this dietary intervention?…

James Versalovic
Dr. James Versalovic received his M.D. with Honors at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) in 1995 and his Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Biology at BCM in 1994. He pursued clinical pathology/medical microbiology residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He also received postdoctoral research training in the Division of Comparative Medicine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Versalovic joined the medical staff as a clinical pathologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital and served as Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School from 1999-2001. He is board-certified in clinical pathology, molecular genetic pathology, and molecular diagnostics. Dr. Versalovic currently serves as Pathologist-In-Chief, Head of the Department of Pathology, and as member of the Board of Directors at Texas Children’s Hospital. He also serves as Vice Chair of Molecular Pathology and Omics at BCM, and Director of the Texas Children’s Microbiome Center. He holds the Milton J. Finegold endowed chair as Professor of Pathology & Immunology, and Professor of Pediatrics, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. He is Co-Director of the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program at Baylor. He served as Editor-in-Chief of the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and Editor of Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics and Related Strategies. As a Principal Investigator, his primary research interests include the human microbiome, probiotics, medical and molecular microbiology, innate immunity, digestive diseases, and gastrointestinal physiology. His research program has been supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, and Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America. Dr. Versalovic has authored 131 primary manuscripts, 34 book chapters, and 2 patents. He received the Lansky Award as a national leader in pathology under the age of 45 from the College of American Pathologists Foundation. He also received the BioGaia Ivan Casas Probiotics Research Award and the BCM Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Distinguished Alumnus Award.

The Third International Congress of Translational Research in Human Nutrition took place in Clermont-Ferrand, France, on June 26 & 27, 2015. In this post, we bring you an overview of three symposia: clinical implication of gut microbiota knowledge, microbiota and non-intestinal diseases, and microbiota and intestinal integrity. Follow this link to read the first part of this report.   Symposium 3…

Amandine Everard
Postdoctoral position, supported by the FNRS (Fond National de la Recherche Scientifique), in the metabolism and nutrition research group (team of Prof. Patrice D. Cani), at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL). CERTIFICATE : Master in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2010 - Doctoral in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences supervised by the Professor Patrice D. Cani, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2014. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Interactions between gut microbiota and intestinal epithelium in metabolic disorders associated with obesity.

The Third International Congress of Translational Research in Human Nutrition took place in Clermont-Ferrand, France, on June 26 & 27, 2015. In this post, we bring you an overview of three symposia: clinical implication of gut microbiota knowledge, microbiota and non-intestinal diseases, and microbiota and intestinal integrity. Follow this link to read the first part of this report.   Symposium 3…

Amandine Everard
Postdoctoral position, supported by the FNRS (Fond National de la Recherche Scientifique), in the metabolism and nutrition research group (team of Prof. Patrice D. Cani), at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL). CERTIFICATE : Master in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2010 - Doctoral in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences supervised by the Professor Patrice D. Cani, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2014. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Interactions between gut microbiota and intestinal epithelium in metabolic disorders associated with obesity.

For Catherine Lozupone, formerly a researcher in the Knight and Gordon labs and now faculty at the University of Colorado, characterizing a 'healthy microbiota' or even a 'healthy diet' is far from straightforward. At Experimental Biology 2015 in March, Lozupone presented her research and brought forward a provocative idea: a healthy microbiota is one that matches your diet. She spoke…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

For Catherine Lozupone, formerly a researcher in the Knight and Gordon labs and now faculty at the University of Colorado, characterizing a 'healthy microbiota' or even a 'healthy diet' is far from straightforward. At Experimental Biology 2015 in March, Lozupone presented her research and brought forward a provocative idea: a healthy microbiota is one that matches your diet. She spoke…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are complex chronic diseases with rapidly growing prevalence across the world. Human studies have found that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to T2DM; the clearest lifestyle factors are high caloric intake and low physical activity. The mechanisms by which human T2DM arises is still unclear, but obesity, insulin resistance and ß-cell dysfunction…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are complex chronic diseases with rapidly growing prevalence across the world. Human studies have found that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to T2DM; the clearest lifestyle factors are high caloric intake and low physical activity. The mechanisms by which human T2DM arises is still unclear, but obesity, insulin resistance and ß-cell dysfunction…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Amir Zarrinpar (MD, PhD) is a gastroenterologist with UC San Diego Health, and a researcher at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. His mouse research on the role of the gut microbiota in obesity and metabolic disease was presented earlier this year in a short talk at the 2015 Keystone Symposium, Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology. Zarrinpar answered some questions…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Amir Zarrinpar (MD, PhD) is a gastroenterologist with UC San Diego Health, and a researcher at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. His mouse research on the role of the gut microbiota in obesity and metabolic disease was presented earlier this year in a short talk at the 2015 Keystone Symposium, Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology. Zarrinpar answered some questions…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The higher rates of colon cancer in Americans of African origin compared to South Africans are usually attributed to diets containing more animal protein and fat and less fibre. O'Keefe et al. investigated (in a paper published in Nature Communications) the role of fat and fibre in this association by conducting 2-week-long food changes in volunteers from both populations: African-Americans…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The higher rates of colon cancer in Americans of African origin compared to South Africans are usually attributed to diets containing more animal protein and fat and less fibre. O'Keefe et al. investigated (in a paper published in Nature Communications) the role of fat and fibre in this association by conducting 2-week-long food changes in volunteers from both populations: African-Americans…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dr. Liping Zhao, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is at the cutting edge of research on how the gut microbiota influence obesity. Gut Microbiota for Health editors are pleased to bring you a video interview with Dr. Zhao as part of our conference highlights from the 2015 Keystone Symposium, "Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology: The Search for Mechanism". In…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. Liping Zhao, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is at the cutting edge of research on how the gut microbiota influence obesity. Gut Microbiota for Health editors are pleased to bring you a video interview with Dr. Zhao as part of our conference highlights from the 2015 Keystone Symposium, "Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology: The Search for Mechanism". In…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are a heterogenous group, and many report symptoms triggered by diet: most commonly wheat/grains, certain vegetables, milk products, fatty foods, spicy foods, coffee, and alcohol. A review published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology discusses the relationship between symptoms, diet, and microbiota in IBS. Authors summarize evidence on how diet and intestinal microbiota impact…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are a heterogenous group, and many report symptoms triggered by diet: most commonly wheat/grains, certain vegetables, milk products, fatty foods, spicy foods, coffee, and alcohol. A review published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology discusses the relationship between symptoms, diet, and microbiota in IBS. Authors summarize evidence on how diet and intestinal microbiota impact…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter