Category : Obesity

Dr. Liping Zhao, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is at the cutting edge of research on how the gut microbiota influence obesity. Gut Microbiota for Health editors are pleased to bring you a video interview with Dr. Zhao as part of our conference highlights from the 2015 Keystone Symposium, "Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology: The Search for Mechanism". In…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. Liping Zhao, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is at the cutting edge of research on how the gut microbiota influence obesity. Gut Microbiota for Health editors are pleased to bring you a video interview with Dr. Zhao as part of our conference highlights from the 2015 Keystone Symposium, "Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology: The Search for Mechanism". In…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Maria Carmen Collado, of the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology at the Spanish National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), studies microbiota-host interactions. She spoke at Experimental Biology 2015 at a symposium called 'An interdisciplinary examination of potential effects of maternal obesity on lactation physiology and the human milk microbiome'. After the session, she spoke with GMFH editors. "Mothers can transfer the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Maria Carmen Collado, of the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology at the Spanish National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), studies microbiota-host interactions. She spoke at Experimental Biology 2015 at a symposium called 'An interdisciplinary examination of potential effects of maternal obesity on lactation physiology and the human milk microbiome'. After the session, she spoke with GMFH editors. "Mothers can transfer the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

In this paper, the first aim we had with Dr. Amandine Everard, was to investigate whether some key molecules involved in the innate immune system, mainly MyD88 [myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88], may contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and low grade inflammation. This is not something novel, because we knew that MyD88 or Toll-like receptors are involved in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Neha Alang and Colleen R. Kelly recently reported that a patient who had received fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) developed obesity (1). Although it is impossible to be sure about the role of FMT in this very case, it seems wise to exclude obese donors from FMT. This 32-year-old patient required FMT for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Before FMT she…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Neha Alang and Colleen R. Kelly recently reported that a patient who had received fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) developed obesity (1). Although it is impossible to be sure about the role of FMT in this very case, it seems wise to exclude obese donors from FMT. This 32-year-old patient required FMT for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Before FMT she…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Karine Clément is a physician and a professor at Paris 6 Pierre et Marie Curie University in Paris and director of an INSERM team. She is also the director of ICAN (Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition),Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital, which focuses on care, research, and training in cardiometabolic diseases with the aim of developing methods for personalized medicine. She recently gave a talk…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Karine Clément is a physician and a professor at Paris 6 Pierre et Marie Curie University in Paris and director of an INSERM team. She is also the director of ICAN (Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition),Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital, which focuses on care, research, and training in cardiometabolic diseases with the aim of developing methods for personalized medicine. She recently gave a talk…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In an article published online on June 24, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Zhongyi Chen and Lilu Guo, from the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, showed that the administration of a modified bacteria expressing therapeutic factors in the gut microbiota could reduce food intake and obesity. By adding an engineered NAPE*-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 strain in the drinking water of mice for 8 weeks,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Following our video series from the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2014, here is the interview of Prof. Max Nieuwdorp on the connection between metabolic syndrome and obesity to the gut microbiota.     https://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/videos/gmfh2014-interviews/Max-Nieuwdorp.mp4

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Following our video series from the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2014, here is the interview of Prof. Max Nieuwdorp on the connection between metabolic syndrome and obesity to the gut microbiota.     https://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/videos/gmfh2014-interviews/Max-Nieuwdorp.mp4

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team