Category : Immune Health

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, Dr. Patrick Schloss (University of Michigan) and his team found that the gut microbiome could enrich current methods of testing for colon cancer. The group characterized the gut microbiome from stool samples of patients in three stages of colorectal cancer development: healthy, adenoma, and carcinoma. They found distinct features of the bacterial populations…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, Dr. Patrick Schloss (University of Michigan) and his team found that the gut microbiome could enrich current methods of testing for colon cancer. The group characterized the gut microbiome from stool samples of patients in three stages of colorectal cancer development: healthy, adenoma, and carcinoma. They found distinct features of the bacterial populations…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A Nature Medicine paper by Hitesh S Deshmukh and colleagues from the Division of Neonatology, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsilvania, USA reports an important aspect to the use of antibiotics in the integrity of the immune system in the newborn. Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother’s microbiota and is…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A Nature Medicine paper by Hitesh S Deshmukh and colleagues from the Division of Neonatology, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsilvania, USA reports an important aspect to the use of antibiotics in the integrity of the immune system in the newborn. Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother’s microbiota and is…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dr. Tomas de Wouters covered #GMFH2014 the Gut Microbiota for Health Summit which took place from March 8th to March 9th, 2014 in Miami. We have asked him his feedback on the event. You can follow Tomas here on GMFHx.com and on Twitter @tdewouters.   Can you introduce yourself, your work and interest in the gut microbiota? Tomas: Initially trained as a Food Engineer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. Tomas de Wouters covered #GMFH2014 the Gut Microbiota for Health Summit which took place from March 8th to March 9th, 2014 in Miami. We have asked him his feedback on the event. You can follow Tomas here on GMFHx.com and on Twitter @tdewouters.   Can you introduce yourself, your work and interest in the gut microbiota? Tomas: Initially trained as a Food Engineer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Dr Elena Verdú's lab seeks to understand the complex pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease, with a focus on microbiota-diet interactions, to identify novel therapeutic targets for these disorders.     1/ What strikes you most in the evolution of research on gut microbiota and why? One interesting aspect relates to the way we have approached the study of the microbiota. We…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr Elena Verdú's lab seeks to understand the complex pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease, with a focus on microbiota-diet interactions, to identify novel therapeutic targets for these disorders.     1/ What strikes you most in the evolution of research on gut microbiota and why? One interesting aspect relates to the way we have approached the study of the microbiota. We…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Sahar El Aidy presented us her recent work about mice colonization as a model to study host-microbial homeostasis dynamics. This work was done under the supervision of Michiel Kleerebezem at Wageningen University (The Netherlands) : 1) What is your background ? I received my BSc degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Egypt, my MSc degree…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Sahar El Aidy presented us her recent work about mice colonization as a model to study host-microbial homeostasis dynamics. This work was done under the supervision of Michiel Kleerebezem at Wageningen University (The Netherlands) : 1) What is your background ? I received my BSc degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Egypt, my MSc degree…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

[This article is an outside contribution by Dr Patricia Lepage (INRA), co-author of the paper. For further references about the author, see the short bio hereunder]   Research jointly conducted by investigators at Institut Gustave Roussy, Inserm, Institut Pasteur and INRA (National Agronomic Research Institute) in France has led to a rather surprising discovery on the manner in which cancer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

[This article is an outside contribution by Dr Patricia Lepage (INRA), co-author of the paper. For further references about the author, see the short bio hereunder]   Research jointly conducted by investigators at Institut Gustave Roussy, Inserm, Institut Pasteur and INRA (National Agronomic Research Institute) in France has led to a rather surprising discovery on the manner in which cancer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team