Category : Inflammation

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Previous research has shown that the gut microbiota may have a role in the pathogenesis of immune-related diseases involving chronic inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and others. A recent review, led by Dr. Hai Lu from the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University in Guangzhou (China), discusses the existing…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the gut microbiota may have a role in the pathogenesis of immune-related diseases involving chronic inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and others. A recent review, led by Dr. Hai Lu from the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University in Guangzhou (China), discusses the existing…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The inaugural Mucosal Immunology Course and Symposium were held in Toronto (Canada) July 27-30, 2016, with specific focus on the microbiota and mucosal immunity in health and disease.  The “Principles of Mucosal Immunology” course, held one day prior to the symposium, featured a full day of talks by experts in the field of mucosal immunology. The speakers provided a comprehensive…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The inaugural Mucosal Immunology Course and Symposium were held in Toronto (Canada) July 27-30, 2016, with specific focus on the microbiota and mucosal immunity in health and disease.  The “Principles of Mucosal Immunology” course, held one day prior to the symposium, featured a full day of talks by experts in the field of mucosal immunology. The speakers provided a comprehensive…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

A new study, led by Professor Heinrich Jasper from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato (USA), has found that inhibiting age-related inflammation maintains a healthy gut microbiota and extends lifespan in flies.   Aging in flies and humans is associated with chronic inflammation, several tissue dysfunctions such as metaplasias, and ‘dysbiosis’ of the commensal microbiota. Research at…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A new study, led by Professor Heinrich Jasper from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato (USA), has found that inhibiting age-related inflammation maintains a healthy gut microbiota and extends lifespan in flies.   Aging in flies and humans is associated with chronic inflammation, several tissue dysfunctions such as metaplasias, and ‘dysbiosis’ of the commensal microbiota. Research at…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A study by De Palma, et al. used germ-free and specific pathogen-free mouse models to investigate the effects of early-life stress. Researchers reported that stress (maternal separation) altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice. Colonizing adult germ-free mice with the same microbiota led to distinct microbial profiles in mice who had experienced early-life stress. After colonization, behaviour was altered in the stressed…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A study by De Palma, et al. used germ-free and specific pathogen-free mouse models to investigate the effects of early-life stress. Researchers reported that stress (maternal separation) altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice. Colonizing adult germ-free mice with the same microbiota led to distinct microbial profiles in mice who had experienced early-life stress. After colonization, behaviour was altered in the stressed…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

In this Nature Medicine news article, Roxanne Khamsi reports on research around the world showing the microbiome exerts an influence on the human immune system. If scientists knew how to control the key process of inflammation, they could profoundly influence the course of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, heart disease, and liver disease. Khamsi covers several possibilities on how…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

In this Nature Medicine news article, Roxanne Khamsi reports on research around the world showing the microbiome exerts an influence on the human immune system. If scientists knew how to control the key process of inflammation, they could profoundly influence the course of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, heart disease, and liver disease. Khamsi covers several possibilities on how…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Yava L. Jones-Hall, Ariangela Kozik and Cindy Nakatsu from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, have recently published a paper in PLoS ONE on the role of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and the impact of this pro-inflammatory cytokine on the gut microbiota. The data presented in this paper show that TNF contributes to the local inflammation…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Yava L. Jones-Hall, Ariangela Kozik and Cindy Nakatsu from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, have recently published a paper in PLoS ONE on the role of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and the impact of this pro-inflammatory cytokine on the gut microbiota. The data presented in this paper show that TNF contributes to the local inflammation…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is known for exhibiting anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo by secreted metabolites that block nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The low proportion of F. prausnitzii in the microbiome of Crohn’s disease patients characterizes the microbial dysbiosis associated with that condition. In a recent paper published in Gut, a team from the Gastroenterology & Nutrition Department from Saint-Antoine Hospital in Paris showed that F. prausnitzii produces anti-inflammatory bioactive peptides derived from a single 15 kDa…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is known for exhibiting anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo by secreted metabolites that block nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The low proportion of F. prausnitzii in the microbiome of Crohn’s disease patients characterizes the microbial dysbiosis associated with that condition. In a recent paper published in Gut, a team from the Gastroenterology & Nutrition Department from Saint-Antoine Hospital in Paris showed that F. prausnitzii produces anti-inflammatory bioactive peptides derived from a single 15 kDa…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Many disorders are associated with impaired function of the gut barrier. The gut microbiota regulates gut barrier function, and previous research has shown that modulation of gut microbiota shows promise for enhancing barrier integrity. Researchers from France and Canada wanted to know if Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 was as effective as the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165 (already known to control…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Many disorders are associated with impaired function of the gut barrier. The gut microbiota regulates gut barrier function, and previous research has shown that modulation of gut microbiota shows promise for enhancing barrier integrity. Researchers from France and Canada wanted to know if Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 was as effective as the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165 (already known to control…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Yasmine Belkaid of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is chief of the Mucosal Immunology section and co-director of the trans-NIH metaorganisms initiative. Her work explores mechanisms at barrier sites (i.e. skin and gut) that regulate immune responses to pathogens. Belkaid presented a talk at the recent Keystone Symposium called, "Compartmentalized…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Yasmine Belkaid of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is chief of the Mucosal Immunology section and co-director of the trans-NIH metaorganisms initiative. Her work explores mechanisms at barrier sites (i.e. skin and gut) that regulate immune responses to pathogens. Belkaid presented a talk at the recent Keystone Symposium called, "Compartmentalized…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter