Category : Barrier

The gut microbiota has wide-ranging effects on host physiology and is an important determinant of health and disease. As we have learned over the past two decades, these effects are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract, but can influence host functions throughout the body.  A great deal of research has focused on understanding the mechanisms by which microbes influence host…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The gut microbiota has wide-ranging effects on host physiology and is an important determinant of health and disease. As we have learned over the past two decades, these effects are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract, but can influence host functions throughout the body.  A great deal of research has focused on understanding the mechanisms by which microbes influence host…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

In addition to playing a crucial role in physiological processes such as digestion of food and vitamin synthesis, the commensal gut microbiota may modulate host susceptibility to enteric pathogens. However, the specific mechanisms by which individual bacterial species contribute to pathogen tolerance are poorly studied. A recent report, led by Dr. Howard C. Hang from the Laboratory of Chemical Biology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

In addition to playing a crucial role in physiological processes such as digestion of food and vitamin synthesis, the commensal gut microbiota may modulate host susceptibility to enteric pathogens. However, the specific mechanisms by which individual bacterial species contribute to pathogen tolerance are poorly studied. A recent report, led by Dr. Howard C. Hang from the Laboratory of Chemical Biology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Many disorders are associated with impaired function of the gut barrier. The gut microbiota regulates gut barrier function, and previous research has shown that modulation of gut microbiota shows promise for enhancing barrier integrity. Researchers from France and Canada wanted to know if Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 was as effective as the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165 (already known to control…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Many disorders are associated with impaired function of the gut barrier. The gut microbiota regulates gut barrier function, and previous research has shown that modulation of gut microbiota shows promise for enhancing barrier integrity. Researchers from France and Canada wanted to know if Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 was as effective as the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165 (already known to control…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Lora Hooper is a professor in the Department of Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas), and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her lab studies immune mechanisms that prevent bacteria from crossing intestinal barriers and entering host tissues. Hooper sat down to talk with GMFH editors at the Keystone Symposium earlier this month. How…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Lora Hooper is a professor in the Department of Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas), and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her lab studies immune mechanisms that prevent bacteria from crossing intestinal barriers and entering host tissues. Hooper sat down to talk with GMFH editors at the Keystone Symposium earlier this month. How…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Yasmine Belkaid of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is chief of the Mucosal Immunology section and co-director of the trans-NIH metaorganisms initiative. Her work explores mechanisms at barrier sites (i.e. skin and gut) that regulate immune responses to pathogens. Belkaid presented a talk at the recent Keystone Symposium called, "Compartmentalized…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Yasmine Belkaid of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is chief of the Mucosal Immunology section and co-director of the trans-NIH metaorganisms initiative. Her work explores mechanisms at barrier sites (i.e. skin and gut) that regulate immune responses to pathogens. Belkaid presented a talk at the recent Keystone Symposium called, "Compartmentalized…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Prof. Stephan Schreiber is a physician, working as a gastroenterologist. He's also a director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine at Kiel Campus of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Germany. His main research focus has been the molecular etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases in the gut. He accepted to give us a quick overview of his work and future challenges…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Prof. Stephan Schreiber is a physician, working as a gastroenterologist. He's also a director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine at Kiel Campus of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Germany. His main research focus has been the molecular etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases in the gut. He accepted to give us a quick overview of his work and future challenges…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.