Category : Autoimmune Diseases

This article, published in Cell Host & Microbe, looked at human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) Envelope gp41 antibodies. (Gp41 is a protein on the surface of HIV that helps the virus invade the host's cells; it is of interest to those aiming to develop HIV vaccines.) Researchers wanted to know what shaped gp41 antibody response to HIV-1. Their findings supported…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This article, published in Cell Host & Microbe, looked at human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) Envelope gp41 antibodies. (Gp41 is a protein on the surface of HIV that helps the virus invade the host's cells; it is of interest to those aiming to develop HIV vaccines.) Researchers wanted to know what shaped gp41 antibody response to HIV-1. Their findings supported…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Dr Elena Verdú's lab seeks to understand the complex pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease, with a focus on microbiota-diet interactions, to identify novel therapeutic targets for these disorders.     1/ What strikes you most in the evolution of research on gut microbiota and why? One interesting aspect relates to the way we have approached the study of the microbiota. We…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr Elena Verdú's lab seeks to understand the complex pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease, with a focus on microbiota-diet interactions, to identify novel therapeutic targets for these disorders.     1/ What strikes you most in the evolution of research on gut microbiota and why? One interesting aspect relates to the way we have approached the study of the microbiota. We…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

[This article is an outside contribution by Dr Patricia Lepage (INRA), co-author of the paper. For further references about the author, see the short bio hereunder]   Research jointly conducted by investigators at Institut Gustave Roussy, Inserm, Institut Pasteur and INRA (National Agronomic Research Institute) in France has led to a rather surprising discovery on the manner in which cancer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

[This article is an outside contribution by Dr Patricia Lepage (INRA), co-author of the paper. For further references about the author, see the short bio hereunder]   Research jointly conducted by investigators at Institut Gustave Roussy, Inserm, Institut Pasteur and INRA (National Agronomic Research Institute) in France has led to a rather surprising discovery on the manner in which cancer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team