Category : Allergies

Life-threatening food allergies are constantly increasing in Westernized countries and alterations in the gut microbiome, especially in early life, could contribute to the rise in their prevalence. Although both a reduced bacterial diversity and an increased Enterobacteriaceae/Bacteroidaceae ratio in infancy have been associated with food sensitization, as well as increased levels of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) in germ-free and antibiotics-treated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Life-threatening food allergies are constantly increasing in Westernized countries and alterations in the gut microbiome, especially in early life, could contribute to the rise in their prevalence. Although both a reduced bacterial diversity and an increased Enterobacteriaceae/Bacteroidaceae ratio in infancy have been associated with food sensitization, as well as increased levels of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) in germ-free and antibiotics-treated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Hypotheses regarding the current rise in food allergies in Westernized countries tend to focus on the effect of an altered gut microbiome due to lifestyle changes. Among them, Westernized dietary patterns (but also antibiotic misuse and higher rates of Caesarean birth), have been the most closely studied factors in terms of their possible adverse effect on the gut microbiome, especially…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Hypotheses regarding the current rise in food allergies in Westernized countries tend to focus on the effect of an altered gut microbiome due to lifestyle changes. Among them, Westernized dietary patterns (but also antibiotic misuse and higher rates of Caesarean birth), have been the most closely studied factors in terms of their possible adverse effect on the gut microbiome, especially…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

This article has been coauthored by Marina Pérez-Gordo, Cristobalina Mayorga and Mariona Pascal. Allergic diseases include heterogenous inflammatory pathologies such as respiratory, cutaneous and food allergies. They are characterized by an immunological response with T lymphocytes as the main effector T cells, which promote the induction of other effector cells involved in allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and…

Marina Pérez-Gordo
Basic Medical Science Department, Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, ARADyAL, Madrid, Spain. Institute of Applied and Molecular Medicine (IMMA), Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain.

This article has been coauthored by Marina Pérez-Gordo, Cristobalina Mayorga and Mariona Pascal. Allergic diseases include heterogenous inflammatory pathologies such as respiratory, cutaneous and food allergies. They are characterized by an immunological response with T lymphocytes as the main effector T cells, which promote the induction of other effector cells involved in allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and…

Marina Pérez-Gordo
Basic Medical Science Department, Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, ARADyAL, Madrid, Spain. Institute of Applied and Molecular Medicine (IMMA), Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain.

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is the hallmark of a healthy immune system. Immune cells must be able to recognize pathogenic “non-self” antigens (i.e. microbial pathogens) and mount an appropriate immune response while remaining quiescent towards “self” agents (i.e. commensal microbes) that are harmless to our health. Nowhere else in the human body is this process more…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody in mucosal secretions and has been recognized as a first line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric pathogens. Despite its important role in mucosal immunity and intestinal homeostasis, IgA deficiency—defined by undetectable seric IgA titers (<0.07 mg/ml) with normal IgG concentration—is related to a very mild phenotype in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody in mucosal secretions and has been recognized as a first line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric pathogens. Despite its important role in mucosal immunity and intestinal homeostasis, IgA deficiency—defined by undetectable seric IgA titers (<0.07 mg/ml) with normal IgG concentration—is related to a very mild phenotype in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent observational data in infants (here; here) suggest a developmental origin for childhood atopy and subsequent asthma involving the gut microbiome perturbation and associated metabolic dysfunction in early life. However, little is known regarding gut microbiota maturation over the first year of life in infants at high risk for asthma and whether targeting the gut microbiome may modify disease risk.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Recent observational data in infants (here; here) suggest a developmental origin for childhood atopy and subsequent asthma involving the gut microbiome perturbation and associated metabolic dysfunction in early life. However, little is known regarding gut microbiota maturation over the first year of life in infants at high risk for asthma and whether targeting the gut microbiome may modify disease risk.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The prevalence of childhood allergic diseases is increasing throughout the world. Although previous research (here; here) has found that gut microbial colonization dynamics differ between allergic and healthy infants, little is known regarding the extent to which specific changes in gut microbiota composition in early life could be used as potential biomarkers of later allergic disease, or could be used…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The prevalence of childhood allergic diseases is increasing throughout the world. Although previous research (here; here) has found that gut microbial colonization dynamics differ between allergic and healthy infants, little is known regarding the extent to which specific changes in gut microbiota composition in early life could be used as potential biomarkers of later allergic disease, or could be used…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter