Category : Gut Microbiota Composition

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Dr Tom van den Bogert focused his research on small intestinal microbiota combining cutting edge omics method like metagenomics. He accepted to give us more detailed information about his work conducted in TIFN framework. We advise our readers to follow him on twitter @TomvandenBogert. What is your background? My studies started in Rotterdam where I obtained a bachelor's degree with a specialization in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr Tom van den Bogert focused his research on small intestinal microbiota combining cutting edge omics method like metagenomics. He accepted to give us more detailed information about his work conducted in TIFN framework. We advise our readers to follow him on twitter @TomvandenBogert. What is your background? My studies started in Rotterdam where I obtained a bachelor's degree with a specialization in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor Barbara’s main scientific interest is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. These conditions have been considered for a long time mood disorders. However, there is clear recognition that peripheral and environmental factors as well as the intestinal microbiota participate to their pathophysiology. Subsets of patients develop these condition after a bout of infectious gastroenteritis,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor Barbara’s main scientific interest is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. These conditions have been considered for a long time mood disorders. However, there is clear recognition that peripheral and environmental factors as well as the intestinal microbiota participate to their pathophysiology. Subsets of patients develop these condition after a bout of infectious gastroenteritis,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She developed an innovative preparative pipeline to explore myriads of bacterial proteins that are expressed in the lumen gut of human hosts, and that may have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She developed an innovative preparative pipeline to explore myriads of bacterial proteins that are expressed in the lumen gut of human hosts, and that may have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

There are many questions surrounding the relationship between the functioning of our human body and the presence of the microbes that live in and on us. The current state of knowledge does not allow us to fully understand what impact our microbiota has on our lives. To approach this question, it is important to find out how our gut metagenome…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

There are many questions surrounding the relationship between the functioning of our human body and the presence of the microbes that live in and on us. The current state of knowledge does not allow us to fully understand what impact our microbiota has on our lives. To approach this question, it is important to find out how our gut metagenome…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Using mice models, scientists from UCL and WUR found that Akkermansia muciniphila could have a role in reversing high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, in this study obesity and type-2 diabetes. The two first authors, Amandine Everard and Clara Belzer, having respectively a background in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Molecular Microbiology accepted to give us their feedback on their main findings.   1)…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Using mice models, scientists from UCL and WUR found that Akkermansia muciniphila could have a role in reversing high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, in this study obesity and type-2 diabetes. The two first authors, Amandine Everard and Clara Belzer, having respectively a background in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Molecular Microbiology accepted to give us their feedback on their main findings.   1)…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Can you tell us a little bit about you and how you got interested in Gut Microbiota?   FL: I was trained as a geneticist. As a PhD student (2000-2003), I worked in a lab that used the Drosophila fly  as a model for research. My scientific questions were on immunity (infection resistance, especially those of bacterial origin) in Bruno…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Can you tell us a little bit about you and how you got interested in Gut Microbiota?   FL: I was trained as a geneticist. As a PhD student (2000-2003), I worked in a lab that used the Drosophila fly  as a model for research. My scientific questions were on immunity (infection resistance, especially those of bacterial origin) in Bruno…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

American journalist Michael Pollan shares his experience with the American Gut Project and gives a full overview on the human microbiome as we know it today. "Here were the names of the hundreds of bacterial species that call me home. In sheer numbers, these microbes and their genes dwarf us. It turns out that we are only 10 percent human:…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

American journalist Michael Pollan shares his experience with the American Gut Project and gives a full overview on the human microbiome as we know it today. "Here were the names of the hundreds of bacterial species that call me home. In sheer numbers, these microbes and their genes dwarf us. It turns out that we are only 10 percent human:…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team