Category : Gut Microbiota Composition

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

There are many questions surrounding the relationship between the functioning of our human body and the presence of the microbes that live in and on us. The current state of knowledge does not allow us to fully understand what impact our microbiota has on our lives. To approach this question, it is important to find out how our gut metagenome…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

There are many questions surrounding the relationship between the functioning of our human body and the presence of the microbes that live in and on us. The current state of knowledge does not allow us to fully understand what impact our microbiota has on our lives. To approach this question, it is important to find out how our gut metagenome…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Using mice models, scientists from UCL and WUR found that Akkermansia muciniphila could have a role in reversing high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, in this study obesity and type-2 diabetes. The two first authors, Amandine Everard and Clara Belzer, having respectively a background in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Molecular Microbiology accepted to give us their feedback on their main findings.   1)…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Using mice models, scientists from UCL and WUR found that Akkermansia muciniphila could have a role in reversing high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, in this study obesity and type-2 diabetes. The two first authors, Amandine Everard and Clara Belzer, having respectively a background in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Molecular Microbiology accepted to give us their feedback on their main findings.   1)…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Can you tell us a little bit about you and how you got interested in Gut Microbiota?   FL: I was trained as a geneticist. As a PhD student (2000-2003), I worked in a lab that used the Drosophila fly  as a model for research. My scientific questions were on immunity (infection resistance, especially those of bacterial origin) in Bruno…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Can you tell us a little bit about you and how you got interested in Gut Microbiota?   FL: I was trained as a geneticist. As a PhD student (2000-2003), I worked in a lab that used the Drosophila fly  as a model for research. My scientific questions were on immunity (infection resistance, especially those of bacterial origin) in Bruno…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

American journalist Michael Pollan shares his experience with the American Gut Project and gives a full overview on the human microbiome as we know it today. "Here were the names of the hundreds of bacterial species that call me home. In sheer numbers, these microbes and their genes dwarf us. It turns out that we are only 10 percent human:…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

American journalist Michael Pollan shares his experience with the American Gut Project and gives a full overview on the human microbiome as we know it today. "Here were the names of the hundreds of bacterial species that call me home. In sheer numbers, these microbes and their genes dwarf us. It turns out that we are only 10 percent human:…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Moderator: Francisco Guarner – Speakers: Karen Scott, Colin Hill   Karen Scott’s presentation was designed as a pedagogical introduction to the notion of prebiotics. She put forward the definition given in Gibson et al 2010:  “Prebiotics are a selectively fermented ingredient that results in specific changes in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota, thus conferring benefit(s) upon host…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Moderator: Francisco Guarner – Speakers: Karen Scott, Colin Hill   Karen Scott’s presentation was designed as a pedagogical introduction to the notion of prebiotics. She put forward the definition given in Gibson et al 2010:  “Prebiotics are a selectively fermented ingredient that results in specific changes in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota, thus conferring benefit(s) upon host…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Speakers: Dirk Haller (Germany), Balfour Sartor (USA)   Prof. Haller started his presentation by pointing out that “dysbiosis” is not a good term, because nobody knows what dysbiosis really means. To be able to understand what dysbiosis is, you would have to understand what the normal status quo is, and according to Prof. Haller that is not really well established.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Speakers: Dirk Haller (Germany), Balfour Sartor (USA)   Prof. Haller started his presentation by pointing out that “dysbiosis” is not a good term, because nobody knows what dysbiosis really means. To be able to understand what dysbiosis is, you would have to understand what the normal status quo is, and according to Prof. Haller that is not really well established.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Knowing how microbiota is established in the gut is a very important topic regarding epithelium maturation and immune system developpement. The early studies focused on the dynamic of the microbiota in infant aiming to understand homeostasy mecanisms. The early life microbiota show a low diversity but an high variation in term of species abundance between infants. One of the basic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Knowing how microbiota is established in the gut is a very important topic regarding epithelium maturation and immune system developpement. The early studies focused on the dynamic of the microbiota in infant aiming to understand homeostasy mecanisms. The early life microbiota show a low diversity but an high variation in term of species abundance between infants. One of the basic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

(27 February 2013) Although considerable progress has been made in determining the impact of the gut microbiota on the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, the detailed study and understanding of the composition and effects of this intestinal community still faces numerous methodological and empirical challenges. “Improvement of study design and sample collection, as well…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

(27 February 2013) Although considerable progress has been made in determining the impact of the gut microbiota on the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, the detailed study and understanding of the composition and effects of this intestinal community still faces numerous methodological and empirical challenges. “Improvement of study design and sample collection, as well…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team