Category : Gut Microbiota Composition

Patrick Veiga and MetaHIT colleagues tested how fermented milks product could modulate microbiota. Using a metagenomics approach, they found that the abundance of unknown species increased in the gut when patients took the fermented milk product. Having access to the functional content, authors found that those species had the functional potential to produce butyrate. Patrick Veiga accepted to give us…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrick Veiga and MetaHIT colleagues tested how fermented milks product could modulate microbiota. Using a metagenomics approach, they found that the abundance of unknown species increased in the gut when patients took the fermented milk product. Having access to the functional content, authors found that those species had the functional potential to produce butyrate. Patrick Veiga accepted to give us…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. James Versalovic, M.D., Ph.D, is the director of the Texas Children's Hospital Microbiome Center and head of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Section. He is also a professor at Baylor College of Medicine. As the Gut Microbiota for Health expert on research tools, Dr. Versalovic spoke with us about his pathology and immunology research related to the gut microbiome. How did you become interested in studying the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. James Versalovic, M.D., Ph.D, is the director of the Texas Children's Hospital Microbiome Center and head of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Section. He is also a professor at Baylor College of Medicine. As the Gut Microbiota for Health expert on research tools, Dr. Versalovic spoke with us about his pathology and immunology research related to the gut microbiome. How did you become interested in studying the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In Science Report journal, Zhang and colleagues published a study about Mongolians known to have their own typical lifestyle, notably in terms of dietary habits. Using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing, researchers showed the presence of a phylogenetic core microbiota comprising the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcus, Subdoligranulum and Coprococcus. They have shown that urbanisation may change the composition of their gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In Science Report journal, Zhang and colleagues published a study about Mongolians known to have their own typical lifestyle, notably in terms of dietary habits. Using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing, researchers showed the presence of a phylogenetic core microbiota comprising the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcus, Subdoligranulum and Coprococcus. They have shown that urbanisation may change the composition of their gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Marion Leclerc is a French microbiologist working at INRA  (the French National Institute for Agricultural Research) Jouy-en-Josas Centre. She spoke with Gut Microbiota for Health about her various areas of research.   What research are you doing on functional characterization of the gut microbiota? I am now [cooperating] with Patricia Lepage... we have different projects where we try to go from known…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Marion Leclerc is a French microbiologist working at INRA  (the French National Institute for Agricultural Research) Jouy-en-Josas Centre. She spoke with Gut Microbiota for Health about her various areas of research.   What research are you doing on functional characterization of the gut microbiota? I am now [cooperating] with Patricia Lepage... we have different projects where we try to go from known…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Using a stress model in animals, Da Silva and colleagues induced gut hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity as well as a shift in O-glycosylation of mucins, associated with flattening and loss of the mucus layer cohesive properties. The probiotic L. farciminis bound to intestinal Muc2 prevented stress-induced functional alterations and changes in mucin O-glycosylation and mucus physical properties and restored epithelial…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Lawrence and colleagues tracked two subjects' microbiota over a year, collecting 800 fecal and saliva samples associated with 10,000 longitudinal measurements. They first highlighted the evidence for long-term, overall community stability, as differences between individuals were much larger than variation within individuals. They found a small subset of highly abundant core taxa can be found within each stable period. Secondly, they…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, Dr. Patrick Schloss (University of Michigan) and his team found that the gut microbiome could enrich current methods of testing for colon cancer. The group characterized the gut microbiome from stool samples of patients in three stages of colorectal cancer development: healthy, adenoma, and carcinoma. They found distinct features of the bacterial populations…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, Dr. Patrick Schloss (University of Michigan) and his team found that the gut microbiome could enrich current methods of testing for colon cancer. The group characterized the gut microbiome from stool samples of patients in three stages of colorectal cancer development: healthy, adenoma, and carcinoma. They found distinct features of the bacterial populations…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Karine Clément is a physician and a professor at Paris 6 Pierre et Marie Curie University in Paris and director of an INSERM team. She is also the director of ICAN (Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition),Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital, which focuses on care, research, and training in cardiometabolic diseases with the aim of developing methods for personalized medicine. She recently gave a talk…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Karine Clément is a physician and a professor at Paris 6 Pierre et Marie Curie University in Paris and director of an INSERM team. She is also the director of ICAN (Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition),Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital, which focuses on care, research, and training in cardiometabolic diseases with the aim of developing methods for personalized medicine. She recently gave a talk…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter