Category : Dysbiosis

A recent study lent insight into the role of the microbiota in both diet-related and genetic obesity in humans. This Chinese study, led by Prof. Liping Zhao, Prof. Aihua Yin, and Prof. Huiru Tang, involved 17 children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) -- the most common genetic cause of morbid obesity in children -- and 21 with simple (diet-induced) obesity. The…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A recent study lent insight into the role of the microbiota in both diet-related and genetic obesity in humans. This Chinese study, led by Prof. Liping Zhao, Prof. Aihua Yin, and Prof. Huiru Tang, involved 17 children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) -- the most common genetic cause of morbid obesity in children -- and 21 with simple (diet-induced) obesity. The…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The Third International Congress of Translational Research in Human Nutrition (#ICTRHN2015) took place in Clermont-Ferrand, France, on June 26 & 27, 2015.     In this post, we bring you the highlights of the event introduction on microbiota-host crosstalk and of the first two symposia: new approaches in microbiota characterization, and gut inflammation. Introductory lecture - Microbiota-host crosstalks: Decrypting signals in…

Amandine Everard
Postdoctoral position, supported by the FNRS (Fond National de la Recherche Scientifique), in the metabolism and nutrition research group (team of Prof. Patrice D. Cani), at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL). CERTIFICATE : Master in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2010 - Doctoral in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences supervised by the Professor Patrice D. Cani, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2014. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Interactions between gut microbiota and intestinal epithelium in metabolic disorders associated with obesity.

The Third International Congress of Translational Research in Human Nutrition (#ICTRHN2015) took place in Clermont-Ferrand, France, on June 26 & 27, 2015.     In this post, we bring you the highlights of the event introduction on microbiota-host crosstalk and of the first two symposia: new approaches in microbiota characterization, and gut inflammation. Introductory lecture - Microbiota-host crosstalks: Decrypting signals in…

Amandine Everard
Postdoctoral position, supported by the FNRS (Fond National de la Recherche Scientifique), in the metabolism and nutrition research group (team of Prof. Patrice D. Cani), at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL). CERTIFICATE : Master in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2010 - Doctoral in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences supervised by the Professor Patrice D. Cani, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), 2014. RESEARCH INTERESTS: Interactions between gut microbiota and intestinal epithelium in metabolic disorders associated with obesity.

Bernd Schnabl, MD, is a practicing physician and associate professor at University of California San Diego. His research focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to chronic liver disease. The "leaky gut hypothesis" of liver disease is the idea that bacteria passing from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites may contribute to disease onset and progression. But the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Bernd Schnabl, MD, is a practicing physician and associate professor at University of California San Diego. His research focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to chronic liver disease. The "leaky gut hypothesis" of liver disease is the idea that bacteria passing from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites may contribute to disease onset and progression. But the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dysbiosis -- an abnormal gut microbiota -- is associated with several diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Yet because of the great variation in gut microbiota composition between individuals, dysbiosis can be difficult to define. In a recent article published in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, researchers introduce a new diagnostic test that they say can…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dysbiosis -- an abnormal gut microbiota -- is associated with several diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Yet because of the great variation in gut microbiota composition between individuals, dysbiosis can be difficult to define. In a recent article published in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, researchers introduce a new diagnostic test that they say can…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Taylor Soderborg is a 3rd year MD/PhD student at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, pursuing a PhD in integrative physiology: reproductive sciences track. Her thesis work is focused on the influence of maternal diet-induced obesity on development of the infant microbiome and how this may alter immune system development and later life obesity. She plans to pursue…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Genes contribute to the risk of celiac disease (CD), but the role of environmental factors, including perturbations in gut microbiota, is so far unclear. We recently published a review article focusing on the role of the gut microbiota in oral tolerance to food antigens. The article discusses the potential mechanisms by which the microbiota might contribute to CD. In studies comparing patients with active…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Genes contribute to the risk of celiac disease (CD), but the role of environmental factors, including perturbations in gut microbiota, is so far unclear. We recently published a review article focusing on the role of the gut microbiota in oral tolerance to food antigens. The article discusses the potential mechanisms by which the microbiota might contribute to CD. In studies comparing patients with active…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Philippe de Timary, MD., Ph.D., is a researcher and psychiatrist in the department of Adult Psychiatry and Institute of Neuroscience at Catholic University of Louvain and Hospital Saint-Luc in Brussels, Belgium. With a colleague, Professor Peter Starkel, he opened a clinical unit in the hospital that specializes in the treatment and rehabilitation of alcohol-dependent patients. Recently, de Timary and his colleagues in the lab of Nathalie…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Philippe de Timary, MD., Ph.D., is a researcher and psychiatrist in the department of Adult Psychiatry and Institute of Neuroscience at Catholic University of Louvain and Hospital Saint-Luc in Brussels, Belgium. With a colleague, Professor Peter Starkel, he opened a clinical unit in the hospital that specializes in the treatment and rehabilitation of alcohol-dependent patients. Recently, de Timary and his colleagues in the lab of Nathalie…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This comprehensive set of studies, by researchers in Israel, showed that intestinal microbiota in mice and humans show diurnal changes in composition and function. The changes happen on the scale of hours, and are influenced by the host's feeding rhythms. It is already known that chronic jet lag and shift work is associated with dysbiosis. Here, researchers induced jet lag…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This comprehensive set of studies, by researchers in Israel, showed that intestinal microbiota in mice and humans show diurnal changes in composition and function. The changes happen on the scale of hours, and are influenced by the host's feeding rhythms. It is already known that chronic jet lag and shift work is associated with dysbiosis. Here, researchers induced jet lag…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Professor Mihai Pop, of University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, recently co-authored a paper entitled Diarrhea in young children from low-income countries leads to large-scale alterations in intestinal microbiota composition. He took the time to speak with Gut Microbiota for Health about this study. Why is it important to understand what causes diarrhea? Our study is part of a…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Professor Mihai Pop, of University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, recently co-authored a paper entitled Diarrhea in young children from low-income countries leads to large-scale alterations in intestinal microbiota composition. He took the time to speak with Gut Microbiota for Health about this study. Why is it important to understand what causes diarrhea? Our study is part of a…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Stephen Collins is a gastroenterologist and a researcher at McMaster University in Canada. Collins’ recent studies on the functional relevance of the gut microbiota, in collaboration with Dr. R. DePalma & Dr. P. Bercik, were recently presented at the American Gastroenterological Society’s annual meeting. Meanwhile, in April 2014, his review of the role of the gut microbiota in Irritable…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. Stephen Collins is a gastroenterologist and a researcher at McMaster University in Canada. Collins’ recent studies on the functional relevance of the gut microbiota, in collaboration with Dr. R. DePalma & Dr. P. Bercik, were recently presented at the American Gastroenterological Society’s annual meeting. Meanwhile, in April 2014, his review of the role of the gut microbiota in Irritable…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter