Category : Dysbiosis

Preterm infants exhibit higher rates of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which is a major cause of both mortality and neurodevelopmental morbidity. Although an altered gut microbiota composition and metabolome has been found in preterm infants, the few studies exploring the microbiome in NEC and preterm infants have reported inconsistent results. Within the mechanisms by which the development of NEC occurs, a…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Preterm infants exhibit higher rates of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which is a major cause of both mortality and neurodevelopmental morbidity. Although an altered gut microbiota composition and metabolome has been found in preterm infants, the few studies exploring the microbiome in NEC and preterm infants have reported inconsistent results. Within the mechanisms by which the development of NEC occurs, a…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Microbiome studies carried out in the past decade have led to an enhanced understanding of the gut microbiome in human health. However, most of these studies have been carried out in western countries and the Indian gut microbiome is not well explored. Since dietary habits and lifestyle play a key role in shaping the gut microbiome, large differences in the…

Vineet K. Sharma
Dr. Sharma has been an Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal since July 2011. Dr. Sharma obtained his PhD in Bioinformatics and Biomedical Sciences from IGIB, New Delhi in 2006. After completing his doctoral research, he worked as a scientist at RIKEN, Japan for five years and joined IISER Bhopal after returning to India. He is also the founder and coordinator of the Innovation and Incubation Centre of Entrepreneurship (IICE) at IISER Bhopal. The main focus of Dr. Sharma’s lab is to reveal and analyze the human-associated microbiome among the Indian population and carry out comparative studies with different populations to gain functional insights, while also making comparisons with healthy and disease datasets. Dr. Sharma’s groups also recently sequenced the genome of the peacock, which is the national bird of India.

Microbiome studies carried out in the past decade have led to an enhanced understanding of the gut microbiome in human health. However, most of these studies have been carried out in western countries and the Indian gut microbiome is not well explored. Since dietary habits and lifestyle play a key role in shaping the gut microbiome, large differences in the…

Vineet K. Sharma
Dr. Sharma has been an Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal since July 2011. Dr. Sharma obtained his PhD in Bioinformatics and Biomedical Sciences from IGIB, New Delhi in 2006. After completing his doctoral research, he worked as a scientist at RIKEN, Japan for five years and joined IISER Bhopal after returning to India. He is also the founder and coordinator of the Innovation and Incubation Centre of Entrepreneurship (IICE) at IISER Bhopal. The main focus of Dr. Sharma’s lab is to reveal and analyze the human-associated microbiome among the Indian population and carry out comparative studies with different populations to gain functional insights, while also making comparisons with healthy and disease datasets. Dr. Sharma’s groups also recently sequenced the genome of the peacock, which is the national bird of India.

Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) (such as acetate, propionate, butyrate) are byproducts of bacterial fermentation in the gut and are frequently reduced in people with diabetes, obesity, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. A growing body of research points to the role of SCFAs in governing the mechanism by which the gut microbiome affects host physiology - an exciting prospect considering the current…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) (such as acetate, propionate, butyrate) are byproducts of bacterial fermentation in the gut and are frequently reduced in people with diabetes, obesity, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. A growing body of research points to the role of SCFAs in governing the mechanism by which the gut microbiome affects host physiology - an exciting prospect considering the current…

Megan Mouw
Megan Mouw holds a Bachelor of Science in microbiology from McGill University (Canada). Driven by her experiences at UCSF medical center in San Francisco, Megan is passionate about the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining health and wellness. She is currently perusing graduate studies in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of California Santa Cruz and hopes to share her love of science through writing.

The fact that healthy relatives of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher risk of developing IBD and display mucosal microbiota dysbiosis indicates that both genetic background and alterations of the gut microbiome might trigger disease phenotype. A study, led by Prof. Kevin Whelan from the Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine at King’s College London (United Kingdom),…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The fact that healthy relatives of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher risk of developing IBD and display mucosal microbiota dysbiosis indicates that both genetic background and alterations of the gut microbiome might trigger disease phenotype. A study, led by Prof. Kevin Whelan from the Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine at King’s College London (United Kingdom),…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

According to many scientific studies, having a balanced gut microbiota is essential for gut health. Just like a big city, where the whole community works together to make the place work, our gut is populated by trillions of microbes that help us live a healthy life. “We have a lot of bacteria in our body and the reason they are…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

According to many scientific studies, having a balanced gut microbiota is essential for gut health. Just like a big city, where the whole community works together to make the place work, our gut is populated by trillions of microbes that help us live a healthy life. “We have a lot of bacteria in our body and the reason they are…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A growing number of scientific studies show the diet can affect health through the gut microbiota. However, foods and dietary patterns actually have differing effects on the gut microbiota between individuals. In modulating the gut microbiota of infants, prebiotics and probiotics could turn out to be useful. Treatments with specific probiotics could help regulate an unbalanced microbiota and thus improve,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A growing number of scientific studies show the diet can affect health through the gut microbiota. However, foods and dietary patterns actually have differing effects on the gut microbiota between individuals. In modulating the gut microbiota of infants, prebiotics and probiotics could turn out to be useful. Treatments with specific probiotics could help regulate an unbalanced microbiota and thus improve,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut microbiota has been related to several pathologies over the past two decades. Nevertheless, not all pathology-associated microbiome signatures have been found to be equally consistent and the organization and ecological properties of the intestinal microbial ecosystem remain under-investigated. A new comment published in Nature Microbiology, led by Dr. Jeroen Raes from the VIB Centre for the Biology of Disease/Vrije…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut microbiota has been related to several pathologies over the past two decades. Nevertheless, not all pathology-associated microbiome signatures have been found to be equally consistent and the organization and ecological properties of the intestinal microbial ecosystem remain under-investigated. A new comment published in Nature Microbiology, led by Dr. Jeroen Raes from the VIB Centre for the Biology of Disease/Vrije…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) refers to a clinical spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders triggered by environmental conditions, metabolic disorders and/or infections, which may increase children’s risk of sleep disturbances and mood disorders. A specific subset within the broader clinical spectrum of PANS includes pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections syndrome (PANDAS). An increasing amount of research is focusing…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) refers to a clinical spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders triggered by environmental conditions, metabolic disorders and/or infections, which may increase children’s risk of sleep disturbances and mood disorders. A specific subset within the broader clinical spectrum of PANS includes pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections syndrome (PANDAS). An increasing amount of research is focusing…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent observational data in infants (here; here) suggest a developmental origin for childhood atopy and subsequent asthma involving the gut microbiome perturbation and associated metabolic dysfunction in early life. However, little is known regarding gut microbiota maturation over the first year of life in infants at high risk for asthma and whether targeting the gut microbiome may modify disease risk.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Recent observational data in infants (here; here) suggest a developmental origin for childhood atopy and subsequent asthma involving the gut microbiome perturbation and associated metabolic dysfunction in early life. However, little is known regarding gut microbiota maturation over the first year of life in infants at high risk for asthma and whether targeting the gut microbiome may modify disease risk.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.