Category : Biomarker

The higher rates of colon cancer in Americans of African origin compared to South Africans are usually attributed to diets containing more animal protein and fat and less fibre. O'Keefe et al. investigated (in a paper published in Nature Communications) the role of fat and fibre in this association by conducting 2-week-long food changes in volunteers from both populations: African-Americans…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The higher rates of colon cancer in Americans of African origin compared to South Africans are usually attributed to diets containing more animal protein and fat and less fibre. O'Keefe et al. investigated (in a paper published in Nature Communications) the role of fat and fibre in this association by conducting 2-week-long food changes in volunteers from both populations: African-Americans…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

Observational studies in humans have shown that early life exposure to microbes in a variety of situations is associated with a decreased risk of asthma. These include: - Exposure of a pregnant mother to microbes in order to protect her baby - Exposure of children to livestock or dogs - Growing up with numerous siblings Meanwhile, disruption of normal colonization…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

Observational studies in humans have shown that early life exposure to microbes in a variety of situations is associated with a decreased risk of asthma. These include: - Exposure of a pregnant mother to microbes in order to protect her baby - Exposure of children to livestock or dogs - Growing up with numerous siblings Meanwhile, disruption of normal colonization…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

The 2nd congress on targeting microbiota was held at Institut Pasteur in Paris on October 16-17, 2014. Professor Marvin Edeas, chairman of the scientific committee, warned the attendees about avoiding speculation where the challenge might be prevention instead of finding treatment. This should constitute a step "towards clinical revolution". To introduce this state of the art session, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, French National…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The 2nd congress on targeting microbiota was held at Institut Pasteur in Paris on October 16-17, 2014. Professor Marvin Edeas, chairman of the scientific committee, warned the attendees about avoiding speculation where the challenge might be prevention instead of finding treatment. This should constitute a step "towards clinical revolution". To introduce this state of the art session, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, French National…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. James Versalovic, M.D., Ph.D, is the director of the Texas Children's Hospital Microbiome Center and head of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Section. He is also a professor at Baylor College of Medicine. As the Gut Microbiota for Health expert on research tools, Dr. Versalovic spoke with us about his pathology and immunology research related to the gut microbiome. How did you become interested in studying the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Dr. James Versalovic, M.D., Ph.D, is the director of the Texas Children's Hospital Microbiome Center and head of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Section. He is also a professor at Baylor College of Medicine. As the Gut Microbiota for Health expert on research tools, Dr. Versalovic spoke with us about his pathology and immunology research related to the gut microbiome. How did you become interested in studying the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Thirty organizations from fifteen countries are coming together to conduct gut microbiome research in a new project called MyNewGut. Professor Yolanda Sanz has been appointed MyNewGut's project coordinator and leads the project's human intervention trials on the gut microbiome's ability to metabolise nutrients and influence energy balance. She is a Professor of Research at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Professor Barbara’s main scientific interest is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. These conditions have been considered for a long time mood disorders. However, there is clear recognition that peripheral and environmental factors as well as the intestinal microbiota participate to their pathophysiology. Subsets of patients develop these condition after a bout of infectious gastroenteritis,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor Barbara’s main scientific interest is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. These conditions have been considered for a long time mood disorders. However, there is clear recognition that peripheral and environmental factors as well as the intestinal microbiota participate to their pathophysiology. Subsets of patients develop these condition after a bout of infectious gastroenteritis,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She developed an innovative preparative pipeline to explore myriads of bacterial proteins that are expressed in the lumen gut of human hosts, and that may have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She developed an innovative preparative pipeline to explore myriads of bacterial proteins that are expressed in the lumen gut of human hosts, and that may have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.