Category : Gut Brain Axis

Poor sleep quality is a widespread problem and has been associated with several diseases in humans such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Previous research has reported that the human gut microbiota may express endogenous circadian rhythms, together with findings showing alterations of the gut microbiota in response to sleep deprivation. On the other hand, the gut microbiota and its metabolites…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

Poor sleep quality is a widespread problem and has been associated with several diseases in humans such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Previous research has reported that the human gut microbiota may express endogenous circadian rhythms, together with findings showing alterations of the gut microbiota in response to sleep deprivation. On the other hand, the gut microbiota and its metabolites…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

The community of microorganisms residing in our gut have been shown to affect brain function and behavior. However, scientists still struggle to explain how gut-brain communication occurs. Chu and colleagues have unraveled mechanisms by which gut microbiota affects mice adaptation to fear conditioning. By using a classic Pavlovian test, the authors first trained mice to associate a tone with pain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The community of microorganisms residing in our gut have been shown to affect brain function and behavior. However, scientists still struggle to explain how gut-brain communication occurs. Chu and colleagues have unraveled mechanisms by which gut microbiota affects mice adaptation to fear conditioning. By using a classic Pavlovian test, the authors first trained mice to associate a tone with pain…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Parkinson’s disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and recent studies have widened the immune system and the gut microbiota's contribution to the disease. A new study in mice, led by researchers from the Université de Montréal and McGill University in Canada, shows the involvement of intestinal infections as a trigger in Parkinson’s disease through autoimmune mechanisms.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Parkinson’s disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and recent studies have widened the immune system and the gut microbiota's contribution to the disease. A new study in mice, led by researchers from the Université de Montréal and McGill University in Canada, shows the involvement of intestinal infections as a trigger in Parkinson’s disease through autoimmune mechanisms.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut can alter the chemical structures of drugs, leading to changes in their bioavailability, toxicity and efficacy. Although the gut microbial enzymes responsible for these chemical modifications are poorly understood, microbial mediation of therapeutic effects has been reported for metformin, chemotherapeutic drugs and antidepressants. A gut microbial enzymatic pathway is involved in metabolizing the drug…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut can alter the chemical structures of drugs, leading to changes in their bioavailability, toxicity and efficacy. Although the gut microbial enzymes responsible for these chemical modifications are poorly understood, microbial mediation of therapeutic effects has been reported for metformin, chemotherapeutic drugs and antidepressants. A gut microbial enzymatic pathway is involved in metabolizing the drug…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The enteric nervous system (ENS)—also called “our second brain”—is an autonomous part of the nervous system consisting of in the myenteric and submucosal plexus within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Comprising primary afferent neurons, interneurons and motor neurons, alongside intestinal cells involved in immune responses and endocrine and paracrine functions, it is involved in the sensory-motor control of the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A current challenge in gut microbiome science is that of characterizing the effects of food groups on gut microbial communities instead of focusing on isolated nutrients. Although prebiotics provide health benefits by specifically altering the composition or activity of the gut microbiota, not all dietary fibers are prebiotics and they can benefit gut bacterial groups in different ways. A new…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A current challenge in gut microbiome science is that of characterizing the effects of food groups on gut microbial communities instead of focusing on isolated nutrients. Although prebiotics provide health benefits by specifically altering the composition or activity of the gut microbiota, not all dietary fibers are prebiotics and they can benefit gut bacterial groups in different ways. A new…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by impairments in social interactions and behavior. It is also accompanied by gastrointestinal dysfunction. According to World Health Organization, one child in 160 worldwide has ASD, which tends to persist into adolescence and adulthood. Beyond genes, environmental factors have been suggested to play a role in the onset of…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by impairments in social interactions and behavior. It is also accompanied by gastrointestinal dysfunction. According to World Health Organization, one child in 160 worldwide has ASD, which tends to persist into adolescence and adulthood. Beyond genes, environmental factors have been suggested to play a role in the onset of…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Experimental research has previously shown how the gut microbiota is involved in regulating brain function through the gut-brain axis. Depression and anxiety are among the most prevalent mental health conditions in industrialized countries and there is a current need for novel psychopharmacological medications to be developed for both conditions. Although the gut microbiota has been hypothesized to be involved in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Experimental research has previously shown how the gut microbiota is involved in regulating brain function through the gut-brain axis. Depression and anxiety are among the most prevalent mental health conditions in industrialized countries and there is a current need for novel psychopharmacological medications to be developed for both conditions. Although the gut microbiota has been hypothesized to be involved in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Together with diet, treatment with drugs is a major factor that influences gut microbiota composition. Indeed, the gut microbiota community may contribute to the therapeutic effects of certain drugs. For instance, metformin may act through a close interaction between Bacteroides fragilis, the bile acid glycoursodeoxycholic acid and intestinal farnesoid X receptor to improve metabolic dysfunction in individuals with type 2…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Together with diet, treatment with drugs is a major factor that influences gut microbiota composition. Indeed, the gut microbiota community may contribute to the therapeutic effects of certain drugs. For instance, metformin may act through a close interaction between Bacteroides fragilis, the bile acid glycoursodeoxycholic acid and intestinal farnesoid X receptor to improve metabolic dysfunction in individuals with type 2…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Modulating the gut microbiota has emerged as a means of affecting the central nervous system function and, thus, human behavior, especially in the context of stress, mood and anxiety disorders and even neurocognitive disorders. Clinical studies with probiotics using neuroimaging methods have started exploring the benefits of probiotics in the human brain. Among them, the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Modulating the gut microbiota has emerged as a means of affecting the central nervous system function and, thus, human behavior, especially in the context of stress, mood and anxiety disorders and even neurocognitive disorders. Clinical studies with probiotics using neuroimaging methods have started exploring the benefits of probiotics in the human brain. Among them, the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.