Category : Functional Disorders

Authors of a new Cell paper gave groups of germ-free mice fecal microbiota samples from six healthy adults representing five different habitual diets: American (both a standard diet and a 'primal' diet), Bangladeshi, Malawian, and Amerindian. Each transplant recipient was fed a sequence of five diets, which simulated what the human donors typically consumed, almost as if each mouse had…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Authors of a new Cell paper gave groups of germ-free mice fecal microbiota samples from six healthy adults representing five different habitual diets: American (both a standard diet and a 'primal' diet), Bangladeshi, Malawian, and Amerindian. Each transplant recipient was fed a sequence of five diets, which simulated what the human donors typically consumed, almost as if each mouse had…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

When talking about irritable bowel syndrome [IBS], Dr. Eamonn Quigley eschews the term 'functional disorder'. For Quigley, a gastroenterologist and researcher at Houston Methodist Hospital (USA), it's only a matter of time before the disordered physiology of IBS becomes clear. "First of all, I think it’s a 'real' condition, one that we can recognize fairly readily, [even] given that there…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

When talking about irritable bowel syndrome [IBS], Dr. Eamonn Quigley eschews the term 'functional disorder'. For Quigley, a gastroenterologist and researcher at Houston Methodist Hospital (USA), it's only a matter of time before the disordered physiology of IBS becomes clear. "First of all, I think it’s a 'real' condition, one that we can recognize fairly readily, [even] given that there…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has shown that adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who adopt a low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) diet show an improvement in symptoms within 2 days. Would the low FODMAP diet have the same effect in childhood IBS? Does the gut microbiota predict the success of the diet in children who respond to this dietary intervention?…

James Versalovic
Dr. James Versalovic received his M.D. with Honors at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) in 1995 and his Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Biology at BCM in 1994. He pursued clinical pathology/medical microbiology residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He also received postdoctoral research training in the Division of Comparative Medicine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Versalovic joined the medical staff as a clinical pathologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital and served as Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School from 1999-2001. He is board-certified in clinical pathology, molecular genetic pathology, and molecular diagnostics. Dr. Versalovic currently serves as Pathologist-In-Chief, Head of the Department of Pathology, and as member of the Board of Directors at Texas Children’s Hospital. He also serves as Vice Chair of Molecular Pathology and Omics at BCM, and Director of the Texas Children’s Microbiome Center. He holds the Milton J. Finegold endowed chair as Professor of Pathology & Immunology, and Professor of Pediatrics, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. He is Co-Director of the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program at Baylor. He served as Editor-in-Chief of the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and Editor of Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics and Related Strategies. As a Principal Investigator, his primary research interests include the human microbiome, probiotics, medical and molecular microbiology, innate immunity, digestive diseases, and gastrointestinal physiology. His research program has been supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, and Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America. Dr. Versalovic has authored 131 primary manuscripts, 34 book chapters, and 2 patents. He received the Lansky Award as a national leader in pathology under the age of 45 from the College of American Pathologists Foundation. He also received the BioGaia Ivan Casas Probiotics Research Award and the BCM Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Previous research has shown that adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who adopt a low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) diet show an improvement in symptoms within 2 days. Would the low FODMAP diet have the same effect in childhood IBS? Does the gut microbiota predict the success of the diet in children who respond to this dietary intervention?…

James Versalovic
Dr. James Versalovic received his M.D. with Honors at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) in 1995 and his Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Biology at BCM in 1994. He pursued clinical pathology/medical microbiology residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He also received postdoctoral research training in the Division of Comparative Medicine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Versalovic joined the medical staff as a clinical pathologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital and served as Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School from 1999-2001. He is board-certified in clinical pathology, molecular genetic pathology, and molecular diagnostics. Dr. Versalovic currently serves as Pathologist-In-Chief, Head of the Department of Pathology, and as member of the Board of Directors at Texas Children’s Hospital. He also serves as Vice Chair of Molecular Pathology and Omics at BCM, and Director of the Texas Children’s Microbiome Center. He holds the Milton J. Finegold endowed chair as Professor of Pathology & Immunology, and Professor of Pediatrics, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. He is Co-Director of the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program at Baylor. He served as Editor-in-Chief of the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and Editor of Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics and Related Strategies. As a Principal Investigator, his primary research interests include the human microbiome, probiotics, medical and molecular microbiology, innate immunity, digestive diseases, and gastrointestinal physiology. His research program has been supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, and Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America. Dr. Versalovic has authored 131 primary manuscripts, 34 book chapters, and 2 patents. He received the Lansky Award as a national leader in pathology under the age of 45 from the College of American Pathologists Foundation. He also received the BioGaia Ivan Casas Probiotics Research Award and the BCM Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Dysbiosis -- an abnormal gut microbiota -- is associated with several diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Yet because of the great variation in gut microbiota composition between individuals, dysbiosis can be difficult to define. In a recent article published in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, researchers introduce a new diagnostic test that they say can…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dysbiosis -- an abnormal gut microbiota -- is associated with several diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Yet because of the great variation in gut microbiota composition between individuals, dysbiosis can be difficult to define. In a recent article published in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, researchers introduce a new diagnostic test that they say can…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are a heterogenous group, and many report symptoms triggered by diet: most commonly wheat/grains, certain vegetables, milk products, fatty foods, spicy foods, coffee, and alcohol. A review published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology discusses the relationship between symptoms, diet, and microbiota in IBS. Authors summarize evidence on how diet and intestinal microbiota impact…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are a heterogenous group, and many report symptoms triggered by diet: most commonly wheat/grains, certain vegetables, milk products, fatty foods, spicy foods, coffee, and alcohol. A review published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology discusses the relationship between symptoms, diet, and microbiota in IBS. Authors summarize evidence on how diet and intestinal microbiota impact…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Recently, an (open-access) article co-authored with colleagues Hans Törnblom & Magnus Simrén appeared in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Crosstalk at the mucosal border: importance of the gut microenvironment in IBS. This review addresses the complex pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We discuss four factors that may be involved: Gut microbiota composition Increased intestinal permeability Imbalance in the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recently, an (open-access) article co-authored with colleagues Hans Törnblom & Magnus Simrén appeared in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Crosstalk at the mucosal border: importance of the gut microenvironment in IBS. This review addresses the complex pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We discuss four factors that may be involved: Gut microbiota composition Increased intestinal permeability Imbalance in the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

While a lot of research in gut microbiota is focused on the bacterial community, little research data is available on the microeukaryotic community. Knowledge about the role of the microeukaryotic community in the gut and its interaction with the bacterial community and its host is insufficient (Anderson et al., 2013). One of the commonly observed microeukaryotes is Blastocystis. There is ongoing…

Sudarshan Shetty
PhD candidate at Wageningen UR, studying the human gut microbiome for understanding its role and function in human health.

While a lot of research in gut microbiota is focused on the bacterial community, little research data is available on the microeukaryotic community. Knowledge about the role of the microeukaryotic community in the gut and its interaction with the bacterial community and its host is insufficient (Anderson et al., 2013). One of the commonly observed microeukaryotes is Blastocystis. There is ongoing…

Sudarshan Shetty
PhD candidate at Wageningen UR, studying the human gut microbiome for understanding its role and function in human health.

The pathomechanism of Parkinson´s disease (PD) is well known but its origin is far from completely understood. The fact that among the prodromal signs of PD are constipation and a number of other (autonomically regulated) symptoms that occur years before the onset of movement disorders has given rise to the idea that a peripheral origin may exist. Since a-synuclein inclusions…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The pathomechanism of Parkinson´s disease (PD) is well known but its origin is far from completely understood. The fact that among the prodromal signs of PD are constipation and a number of other (autonomically regulated) symptoms that occur years before the onset of movement disorders has given rise to the idea that a peripheral origin may exist. Since a-synuclein inclusions…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

I participated in the "Targeting microbiota" congress at Pasteur Institute because I considered the topics discussed very interesting and relevant to my research. For me microbiome conferences are still a rather foreign territory, but I very much like to talk to people with a very different view from what I have. And my learning curve in the microbiome field is…

Filip Scheperjans
I am German and studied medicine at the Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany and was a visiting student at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and at the Mount Sinai Medical School in New York. During my studies I started work on my doctoral theses in the C & U Vogt Brain Research Institute about the microscopical and neurochemical anatomy of the human parietal lobe. After graduating, I continued work on my thesis at the Institute of Medicine at the Research Center in Juelich. I received my doctoral degree and my thesis was awarded the best medical thesis in 2008 at Duesseldorf University. In 2007 I moved to Finland and started my clinical specialization in neurology. During this period I completed a 6 month fellowship in our clinical stroke research lab which gave me experience in the planning and conduction of clinical trials. I received my specialist degree in 2013.

In this contribution, GMFH board member Mary Ellen Sanders analyzes one of our recent website selections:  Veiga et al. (2014) Changes of the human gut microbiome induced by a fermented milk product. Probiotics are a promising means to manipulate the microbiome, but there is little evidence that they can do this by changing the microbiota composition. Yes, the genus or…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

In this contribution, GMFH board member Mary Ellen Sanders analyzes one of our recent website selections:  Veiga et al. (2014) Changes of the human gut microbiome induced by a fermented milk product. Probiotics are a promising means to manipulate the microbiome, but there is little evidence that they can do this by changing the microbiota composition. Yes, the genus or…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).