Category : Research & Practice

Although gut microbiota maturation is a dynamic process apparent across a lifetime, the first two to three years of life may represent the most critical period for dietary interventions that target the microbiota and its contribution to improving child growth and brain development. One area of current microbiome research studies the close relationship between the development of the gut and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Although gut microbiota maturation is a dynamic process apparent across a lifetime, the first two to three years of life may represent the most critical period for dietary interventions that target the microbiota and its contribution to improving child growth and brain development. One area of current microbiome research studies the close relationship between the development of the gut and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Obesity is currently at pandemic proportions and not only impairs metabolic homeostasis, but is also a risk factor for psychological disorders including depression. Although the underlying mechanisms of these associations are largely unknown, alterations in the communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system (also called the gut-brain axis) could play a key role. A new study, led by…

Yolanda Sanz
Yolanda Sanz holds a PhD in Pharmacy and is Professor of the National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) in Valencia, Spain. She is principal investigator of the Research Unit on Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health at IATA-CSIC. Her scientific field of interest is the role of the human microbiota in health and diseases, which affect the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Currently, she coordinates one of the largest EU projects on the human microbiome that integrates 30 partners of the EU and of USA, CA, NZ and AU (MyNewGut; www.mynewgut.eu). Her scientific contributions are reflected in more than 150 articles published in international peer-reviewed journals, 170 participations in conferences and eight patents.

Obesity is currently at pandemic proportions and not only impairs metabolic homeostasis, but is also a risk factor for psychological disorders including depression. Although the underlying mechanisms of these associations are largely unknown, alterations in the communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system (also called the gut-brain axis) could play a key role. A new study, led by…

Yolanda Sanz
Yolanda Sanz holds a PhD in Pharmacy and is Professor of the National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) in Valencia, Spain. She is principal investigator of the Research Unit on Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health at IATA-CSIC. Her scientific field of interest is the role of the human microbiota in health and diseases, which affect the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Currently, she coordinates one of the largest EU projects on the human microbiome that integrates 30 partners of the EU and of USA, CA, NZ and AU (MyNewGut; www.mynewgut.eu). Her scientific contributions are reflected in more than 150 articles published in international peer-reviewed journals, 170 participations in conferences and eight patents.

The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For the purpose of this article, CAM is defined as therapies that go beyond traditional pharmacological approaches. Patients turn to CAM for many reasons, but most commonly the patient is either unhappy with their current treatment or is looking for a more holistic…

Natasha Haskey
Natasha Haskey is a Registered Dietitian and PhD student at The Centre for Microbiome and Inflammatory Research at the University of British Columbia – Okanagan (Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada). Her research work focuses on how dietary factors influence the gut microbiome, immune system and clinical disease in inflammatory bowel diseases. She is the co-author of the textbook Gut Microbiota: Interactive Effects on Nutrition and Health, which focuses on the gut microbiome as it relates to nutrition. Follow Natasha on Twitter @nhaskeyRD

The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For the purpose of this article, CAM is defined as therapies that go beyond traditional pharmacological approaches. Patients turn to CAM for many reasons, but most commonly the patient is either unhappy with their current treatment or is looking for a more holistic…

Natasha Haskey
Natasha Haskey is a Registered Dietitian and PhD student at The Centre for Microbiome and Inflammatory Research at the University of British Columbia – Okanagan (Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada). Her research work focuses on how dietary factors influence the gut microbiome, immune system and clinical disease in inflammatory bowel diseases. She is the co-author of the textbook Gut Microbiota: Interactive Effects on Nutrition and Health, which focuses on the gut microbiome as it relates to nutrition. Follow Natasha on Twitter @nhaskeyRD

Although diet, alongside drugs, is a major determinant of gut microbiota composition, little is known about how food components specifically modulate the make-up of our microbiota. A new in vitro study, led by Dr. Sylvia Duncan from the Rowett Institute at University of Aberdeen (Scotland, United Kingdom), explores how different carbohydrate substrates influence the diversity of the human colonic microbiota.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although diet, alongside drugs, is a major determinant of gut microbiota composition, little is known about how food components specifically modulate the make-up of our microbiota. A new in vitro study, led by Dr. Sylvia Duncan from the Rowett Institute at University of Aberdeen (Scotland, United Kingdom), explores how different carbohydrate substrates influence the diversity of the human colonic microbiota.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although twin studies have shown that the gut microbiota includes a heritable component, environmental factors relating to diet, drugs and demographic and anthropometric traits are all major determinants of gut microbial diversity. However, the influence of specific nutrient groups on the human gut microbiome in relation to interindividual variation has yet to be investigated. A new study, led by Prof.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although twin studies have shown that the gut microbiota includes a heritable component, environmental factors relating to diet, drugs and demographic and anthropometric traits are all major determinants of gut microbial diversity. However, the influence of specific nutrient groups on the human gut microbiome in relation to interindividual variation has yet to be investigated. A new study, led by Prof.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

This article has been coauthored by Marina Pérez-Gordo, Cristobalina Mayorga and Mariona Pascal. Allergic diseases include heterogenous inflammatory pathologies such as respiratory, cutaneous and food allergies. They are characterized by an immunological response with T lymphocytes as the main effector T cells, which promote the induction of other effector cells involved in allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and…

Marina Pérez-Gordo
Basic Medical Science Department, Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, ARADyAL, Madrid, Spain. Institute of Applied and Molecular Medicine (IMMA), Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain.

This article has been coauthored by Marina Pérez-Gordo, Cristobalina Mayorga and Mariona Pascal. Allergic diseases include heterogenous inflammatory pathologies such as respiratory, cutaneous and food allergies. They are characterized by an immunological response with T lymphocytes as the main effector T cells, which promote the induction of other effector cells involved in allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and…

Marina Pérez-Gordo
Basic Medical Science Department, Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, ARADyAL, Madrid, Spain. Institute of Applied and Molecular Medicine (IMMA), Faculty of Medicine, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain.

Although the human gut microbiome is a source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), until now, the intestinal resistome has not been extensively characterized. Challenges therefore remain, and they include figuring out the gut microbiota's contribution to the total pool of known ARGs and identifying ARGs in metagenomic data, given that they show distant homologies with known genes in databases. Researchers…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although the human gut microbiome is a source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), until now, the intestinal resistome has not been extensively characterized. Challenges therefore remain, and they include figuring out the gut microbiota's contribution to the total pool of known ARGs and identifying ARGs in metagenomic data, given that they show distant homologies with known genes in databases. Researchers…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Rural indigenous populations are nowadays used as a model for studying the current rise in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially obesity. This is down to the previous observation that these populations have the richest and most diverse microbiota ever recorded in humans, including microbial taxa that are absent in westernized populations. Two recent studies explore the impact on the gut microbiome…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The intestinal epithelial barrier is not just a static physical barrier but rather interacts continuously with the gut microbiome and immune cells. An intact intestinal barrier protects the host against invasion of microorganisms and toxins whereas at the same time it allows absorption of essential fluids and nutrients. The pathophysiology of cirrhosis is associated with a dysfunctional intestinal barrier, which…

Oriol Juanola & Rubén Francés
Oriol Juanola is a PhD. student of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University (Alicante, Spain). The group is interested in molecular and cellular aspects around the immune system that are responsible for the surveillance, response and regulation of homeostasis with our gut microbiota in the so-called "gut-liver axis", a central element in different metabolic pathologies within the scope of the gastroenterology and hepatology. The translation of these aspects, addressed from different methodological perspectives, to the clinical field is also relevant for the Group in order to improve the diagnosis, treatment and/or prognosis of these diseases. Rubén Francés is professor of Immunology and Head of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD).

The intestinal epithelial barrier is not just a static physical barrier but rather interacts continuously with the gut microbiome and immune cells. An intact intestinal barrier protects the host against invasion of microorganisms and toxins whereas at the same time it allows absorption of essential fluids and nutrients. The pathophysiology of cirrhosis is associated with a dysfunctional intestinal barrier, which…

Oriol Juanola & Rubén Francés
Oriol Juanola is a PhD. student of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University (Alicante, Spain). The group is interested in molecular and cellular aspects around the immune system that are responsible for the surveillance, response and regulation of homeostasis with our gut microbiota in the so-called "gut-liver axis", a central element in different metabolic pathologies within the scope of the gastroenterology and hepatology. The translation of these aspects, addressed from different methodological perspectives, to the clinical field is also relevant for the Group in order to improve the diagnosis, treatment and/or prognosis of these diseases. Rubén Francés is professor of Immunology and Head of the Hepatic and Intestinal Immunobiology Group at Miguel Hernández University and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD).