Category : Diet

When you consume dietary fibers, it is not your body that breaks them down—it’s the bacteria in your large intestine! Important molecules produced by this bacterial activity are called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which comprise a maximum of six carbon atoms along with atoms of oxygen and hydrogen. Your body absorbs around 95% of these SCFAs and puts them to…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

When you consume dietary fibers, it is not your body that breaks them down—it’s the bacteria in your large intestine! Important molecules produced by this bacterial activity are called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which comprise a maximum of six carbon atoms along with atoms of oxygen and hydrogen. Your body absorbs around 95% of these SCFAs and puts them to…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The power of food to impact your health is not a new idea, but it is only with emerging research on the human gut microbiota that scientists are beginning to understand exactly how this happens. Whether you eat a strawberry or a hamburger, the food components enter your digestive system and encounter the intestinal microbes. Through a series of complex…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The power of food to impact your health is not a new idea, but it is only with emerging research on the human gut microbiota that scientists are beginning to understand exactly how this happens. Whether you eat a strawberry or a hamburger, the food components enter your digestive system and encounter the intestinal microbes. Through a series of complex…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Every time you eat whole grains, fresh fruit and vegetables - foods very rich in dietary fibre, which is a type of carbohydrate present in plants - you are not only taking care of your health, but also nourishing some of the trillion microbes inhabiting your gut that, in turn, take care of you. And as a new study suggests,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Every time you eat whole grains, fresh fruit and vegetables - foods very rich in dietary fibre, which is a type of carbohydrate present in plants - you are not only taking care of your health, but also nourishing some of the trillion microbes inhabiting your gut that, in turn, take care of you. And as a new study suggests,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Ever wonder why the diet your doctor prescribed, which you followed for several months, failed to work despite all your efforts? Or why although you eat healthily you can’t lose a measly pound while your gym mates are all slimming down? Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have now discovered and proven for the first time the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Ever wonder why the diet your doctor prescribed, which you followed for several months, failed to work despite all your efforts? Or why although you eat healthily you can’t lose a measly pound while your gym mates are all slimming down? Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have now discovered and proven for the first time the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Since ancient times, many cultures around the world have included foods rich in microbes - friendly bacteria able to give a helping hand to our microbiota and overall health – in their traditional diet. Scientists are starting to better understand the role of these microorganisms and how they can have a positive impact on the health of our gut. At…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Since ancient times, many cultures around the world have included foods rich in microbes - friendly bacteria able to give a helping hand to our microbiota and overall health – in their traditional diet. Scientists are starting to better understand the role of these microorganisms and how they can have a positive impact on the health of our gut. At…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor of Nutrition, Director of the Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN) linked to the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and head of a research group at INSERM; it is no surprise that Karine Clément is a well-known expert in metabolic diseases, nutrition and the role the gut microbiota plays in these conditions. Last year, she received…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor of Nutrition, Director of the Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN) linked to the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and head of a research group at INSERM; it is no surprise that Karine Clément is a well-known expert in metabolic diseases, nutrition and the role the gut microbiota plays in these conditions. Last year, she received…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In this interview, filmed during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit, Professor Magnus Simrén of the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) and Chairman of the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Scientific Committee, explains to Gut Microbiota Worldwatch the relationship between the gut microbiota and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The video tells us exactly what irritable bowel syndrome is, what kind of…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In this interview, filmed during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit, Professor Magnus Simrén of the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) and Chairman of the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Scientific Committee, explains to Gut Microbiota Worldwatch the relationship between the gut microbiota and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The video tells us exactly what irritable bowel syndrome is, what kind of…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit we had the opportunity to talk to Professor Colin Hill of the APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork to find out how diet influences our gut microbiota. During the interview, Hill, who is also the president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics - ISAPP discussed a range of…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit we had the opportunity to talk to Professor Colin Hill of the APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork to find out how diet influences our gut microbiota. During the interview, Hill, who is also the president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics - ISAPP discussed a range of…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Yanomami indigenous people, who live in the Amazonian jungle in Venezuela, have the most diverse collection of bacteria ever found in humans, some of which had never been previously identified, says a study published in Science Advances. In fact, some of these new microbes have a positive effect on health, such as protecting carriers against kidney stones. This semi-nomadic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Yanomami indigenous people, who live in the Amazonian jungle in Venezuela, have the most diverse collection of bacteria ever found in humans, some of which had never been previously identified, says a study published in Science Advances. In fact, some of these new microbes have a positive effect on health, such as protecting carriers against kidney stones. This semi-nomadic…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

  Several studies have linked our lifestyle to gut microbiota composition. Factors such as continuous stress, an unbalanced diet rich in fats or sedentary habits, among others, are believed to be linked to our gut’s collection of microbes. The underlying mechanisms of this, however, were not fully understood. Now, new research published in Cell Reports suggests the reason why Western…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

  Several studies have linked our lifestyle to gut microbiota composition. Factors such as continuous stress, an unbalanced diet rich in fats or sedentary habits, among others, are believed to be linked to our gut’s collection of microbes. The underlying mechanisms of this, however, were not fully understood. Now, new research published in Cell Reports suggests the reason why Western…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team