Category : Metabolic Conditions

It is not for no reason that increasing fibre in your diet is recommended.  Contained in fruits, legumes, veggies and whole grains, this carbohydrate helps keep you healthy, with its virtues backed up by scientific evidence: a diet rich in fibre reduces your risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and arthritis, among other things. Also, and more importantly, it seems…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

It is not for no reason that increasing fibre in your diet is recommended.  Contained in fruits, legumes, veggies and whole grains, this carbohydrate helps keep you healthy, with its virtues backed up by scientific evidence: a diet rich in fibre reduces your risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and arthritis, among other things. Also, and more importantly, it seems…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Many people, when they hear the word "bacteria", think of dirt or disease. It is true, however, that the trillions of bacteria living in our gut, which make up our gut microbiota, carry out duties that are key to our survival. Not only do they help us digest certain foods and extract nutrients and vitamins, they also educate our immune…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Many people, when they hear the word "bacteria", think of dirt or disease. It is true, however, that the trillions of bacteria living in our gut, which make up our gut microbiota, carry out duties that are key to our survival. Not only do they help us digest certain foods and extract nutrients and vitamins, they also educate our immune…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

At the end of 2017, GMFH celebrated its 5th anniversary. As a wrap-up of this celebration, we asked members of our Gut Microbiota for Health board of experts to share their thoughts, on video, about these 5 years in which they contributed toward increased knowledge about the gut microbiota and its role in health, and made the initiative what it’s…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

At the end of 2017, GMFH celebrated its 5th anniversary. As a wrap-up of this celebration, we asked members of our Gut Microbiota for Health board of experts to share their thoughts, on video, about these 5 years in which they contributed toward increased knowledge about the gut microbiota and its role in health, and made the initiative what it’s…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Awareness of the importance of the gut microbiota and its role in the health has grown in parallel with research on the subject. Over the past five years, Gut Microbiota for Health has contributed to this awareness not only through its website and digital ecosystem, but also through its annual Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit, specifically addressed to clinical…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Awareness of the importance of the gut microbiota and its role in the health has grown in parallel with research on the subject. Over the past five years, Gut Microbiota for Health has contributed to this awareness not only through its website and digital ecosystem, but also through its annual Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit, specifically addressed to clinical…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

"Who wants to live like this? We can't even take a shower, much less clean our house...after 17 days confined to bed, not even able to take a bath, much less function at all... where is the quality of life and what is the purpose?" - ‘Linda’, woman with chronic fatigue syndrome Always tired. Continually in pain. Unable to maintain…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

"Who wants to live like this? We can't even take a shower, much less clean our house...after 17 days confined to bed, not even able to take a bath, much less function at all... where is the quality of life and what is the purpose?" - ‘Linda’, woman with chronic fatigue syndrome Always tired. Continually in pain. Unable to maintain…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

As we have already explained in this blog, the way you are born might impact your health with life-long lasting effects. Epidemiological studies have shown there is a correlation between the increase of C-section in the world in the last decades and the rise of diseases such as allergies, celiac disease or obesity. According to World Health Organisation (WHO), C-section…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

As we have already explained in this blog, the way you are born might impact your health with life-long lasting effects. Epidemiological studies have shown there is a correlation between the increase of C-section in the world in the last decades and the rise of diseases such as allergies, celiac disease or obesity. According to World Health Organisation (WHO), C-section…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

It’s well established that bacterial diversity rules in the gut: study after study of intestinal microbiota composition shows that groups of people with a disease have a less diverse gut microbial community than groups without the disease. In some cases, the lack of diversity is referred to as a ‘dysbiosis’. The tricky part is figuring out how the principle of…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

It’s well established that bacterial diversity rules in the gut: study after study of intestinal microbiota composition shows that groups of people with a disease have a less diverse gut microbial community than groups without the disease. In some cases, the lack of diversity is referred to as a ‘dysbiosis’. The tricky part is figuring out how the principle of…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Thinking about travelling this summer to Bali or French Polynesia? Maybe, while you’re reading these lines, you picture yourself lying on a beautiful beach, drinking smoothies, sunbathing and taking dips. Sounds good, really good. But, beware the health problems caused by jetlag during the days after your flight. Fatigue, sleeplessness, dizziness, sleepiness, hunger and even intestinal problems, such as constipation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Thinking about travelling this summer to Bali or French Polynesia? Maybe, while you’re reading these lines, you picture yourself lying on a beautiful beach, drinking smoothies, sunbathing and taking dips. Sounds good, really good. But, beware the health problems caused by jetlag during the days after your flight. Fatigue, sleeplessness, dizziness, sleepiness, hunger and even intestinal problems, such as constipation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.