Category : Metabolic Syndrome

The gut microbiota is now believed to be a factor involved in the onset of cardiometabolic disorders such as obesity. In human and rat studies, the commensal* bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila- which is naturally present in large quantities in the gut microbiota of healthy people - has been gaining a lot of attention for its association with leanness and for producing…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

The gut microbiota is now believed to be a factor involved in the onset of cardiometabolic disorders such as obesity. In human and rat studies, the commensal* bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila- which is naturally present in large quantities in the gut microbiota of healthy people - has been gaining a lot of attention for its association with leanness and for producing…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

The microbes that inhabit our intestines are responsible for several functions such as synthesizing vitamins as well as modulating our immune system, metabolism and blood sugar levels. Recent studies show that the gut microbiota may affect our body’s response to insulin, a hormone that helps glucose enter into the body’s cells so that it can be used as energy. For…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

The microbes that inhabit our intestines are responsible for several functions such as synthesizing vitamins as well as modulating our immune system, metabolism and blood sugar levels. Recent studies show that the gut microbiota may affect our body’s response to insulin, a hormone that helps glucose enter into the body’s cells so that it can be used as energy. For…

Allison Clark
Allison Clark has a master in nutrition and health from Open University in Barcelona and a master in journalism. She is a freelance writer and nutritionist and has written various peer review papers about the role the gut microbiota plays in health, disease and endurance exercise performance. Allison is passionate about the role diet and the gut microbiota play in health and disease. Follow her on Twitter @Heal_your_Gut

Carbohydrates take many forms—but lately, certain ones are getting more attention: the kinds of carbs that resist digestion in the upper portion of the gastrointestinal tract and continue on to meet the gut microorganisms in the colon. Dr. Laure Bindels, Professor at Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), is wondering whether the health benefits of these complex carbohydrates, including resistant starch…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Carbohydrates take many forms—but lately, certain ones are getting more attention: the kinds of carbs that resist digestion in the upper portion of the gastrointestinal tract and continue on to meet the gut microorganisms in the colon. Dr. Laure Bindels, Professor at Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), is wondering whether the health benefits of these complex carbohydrates, including resistant starch…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Professor of Nutrition, Director of the Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN) linked to the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and head of a research group at INSERM; it is no surprise that Karine Clément is a well-known expert in metabolic diseases, nutrition and the role the gut microbiota plays in these conditions. Last year, she received…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor of Nutrition, Director of the Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN) linked to the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and head of a research group at INSERM; it is no surprise that Karine Clément is a well-known expert in metabolic diseases, nutrition and the role the gut microbiota plays in these conditions. Last year, she received…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

L-carnitine, a chemical compound widely present in red meat (and also some energy drinks), alters the composition of gut microbiota, leading to a potentially increased risk of heart disease. A study carried out by researchers at Cleveland Clinic (United States) has shown that the change in the bacteria living in the digestive tract leads to an increase in a compound…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

L-carnitine, a chemical compound widely present in red meat (and also some energy drinks), alters the composition of gut microbiota, leading to a potentially increased risk of heart disease. A study carried out by researchers at Cleveland Clinic (United States) has shown that the change in the bacteria living in the digestive tract leads to an increase in a compound…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team