Category : Immune Health

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronical autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, the brain and other organs. In Spain, between forty and fifty thousand people suffer from lupus, according to the Spanish Association of Lupus (Federación Española de Lupus). A new research study, lead by researchers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronical autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, the brain and other organs. In Spain, between forty and fifty thousand people suffer from lupus, according to the Spanish Association of Lupus (Federación Española de Lupus). A new research study, lead by researchers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The idea that being exposed to animals since early days might reinforce the immune system (part of the so-called “hygiene hypothesis”) has been referred by different studies, A new study recently published in PNAS reinforces this theory and suggests that this protecting effect is due to the changes undergone by the microbial community living in the digestive tract, the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The idea that being exposed to animals since early days might reinforce the immune system (part of the so-called “hygiene hypothesis”) has been referred by different studies, A new study recently published in PNAS reinforces this theory and suggests that this protecting effect is due to the changes undergone by the microbial community living in the digestive tract, the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The fact that newborns are especially vulnerable to bacterial infections is not necessarily a sign of immaturity or even a bad thing; rather it could be understood as something positive. In experiments with mice carried out by paediatricians at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (USA), it has been discovered that a mice newborn’s body deliberately “deactivates” its immune system for a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The fact that newborns are especially vulnerable to bacterial infections is not necessarily a sign of immaturity or even a bad thing; rather it could be understood as something positive. In experiments with mice carried out by paediatricians at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (USA), it has been discovered that a mice newborn’s body deliberately “deactivates” its immune system for a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have already explained that the bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract – the gut microbiota – carry out key functions in terms of people’s health. Among these tasks, this “organ” (as described by some scientists) plays an essential role in our body’s defences. A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (USA) recently observed that the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have already explained that the bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract – the gut microbiota – carry out key functions in terms of people’s health. Among these tasks, this “organ” (as described by some scientists) plays an essential role in our body’s defences. A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (USA) recently observed that the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In spite of being a technique that professionals began to practice and research decades ago, gut microbiota transplantation is an issue that is sparking considerable interest right now as a possible treatment for infections of the intestine (especially those produced by the Clostridium difficile bacteria). Professor Lawrence Brandt, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (USA), is one of the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In spite of being a technique that professionals began to practice and research decades ago, gut microbiota transplantation is an issue that is sparking considerable interest right now as a possible treatment for infections of the intestine (especially those produced by the Clostridium difficile bacteria). Professor Lawrence Brandt, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (USA), is one of the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor of Medical Microbiology Graham Rook, from UCL (University College London), explains in this video the “surprisingly close” relationship between gut microbiota and the immune system. Prof. Rook, who was interviewed during the 2nd Gut Microbiota and Health Summit, compares the immune system to the brain, highlighting the need to educate it as it is “constantly learning”. At the same…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor of Medical Microbiology Graham Rook, from UCL (University College London), explains in this video the “surprisingly close” relationship between gut microbiota and the immune system. Prof. Rook, who was interviewed during the 2nd Gut Microbiota and Health Summit, compares the immune system to the brain, highlighting the need to educate it as it is “constantly learning”. At the same…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The bacteria living in our intestinal tract, the gut microbiota, play a key role in our health. It accomplishes different functions and stimulates the development and maintenance of the intestinal immune system that protects us from being affected by environmental pathogens that sometimes enter the body. A video animation released by Nature featuring the expertise of world-renowned immunologist Tom MacDonald…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The bacteria living in our intestinal tract, the gut microbiota, play a key role in our health. It accomplishes different functions and stimulates the development and maintenance of the intestinal immune system that protects us from being affected by environmental pathogens that sometimes enter the body. A video animation released by Nature featuring the expertise of world-renowned immunologist Tom MacDonald…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

If you took a microscope and zoomed on your intestine, you would find tens of trillions of bacteria that make up your gut microbiota. This community of microorganisms plays a key role in your health and wellbeing, as already reported on this blog, but it can also be affected by a range of external factors, including what we eat and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

If you took a microscope and zoomed on your intestine, you would find tens of trillions of bacteria that make up your gut microbiota. This community of microorganisms plays a key role in your health and wellbeing, as already reported on this blog, but it can also be affected by a range of external factors, including what we eat and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team