Category : Immune Health

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Researchers find new correlations between the gut microbiota and immune response genes in people with multiple sclerosis During the last 15 years, scientists have started to discover that the 100 trillion microorganisms living in our digestive tract –mostly in the colon- play a key role in different body functions, like digestion and training the immune system. What’s more, they have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Researchers find new correlations between the gut microbiota and immune response genes in people with multiple sclerosis During the last 15 years, scientists have started to discover that the 100 trillion microorganisms living in our digestive tract –mostly in the colon- play a key role in different body functions, like digestion and training the immune system. What’s more, they have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Thirty-three percent of people have a gene that predisposes them to celiac disease (CD), while only two to five percent of the population will receive a diagnosis of the condition. Elena Verdú, Associate Professor and researcher at McMaster University in Canada, wants to know why the unlucky minority end up with the disease. "We know that genes are necessary, but…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Thirty-three percent of people have a gene that predisposes them to celiac disease (CD), while only two to five percent of the population will receive a diagnosis of the condition. Elena Verdú, Associate Professor and researcher at McMaster University in Canada, wants to know why the unlucky minority end up with the disease. "We know that genes are necessary, but…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A baby’s diaper may not be the most pleasant thing to look at, but what it contains can provide doctors with a hint about whether that child may develop asthma later in life, thus allowing them to start treating him or her in order to prevent the disease. Researchers have found that four bacteria found in the faeces of a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A baby’s diaper may not be the most pleasant thing to look at, but what it contains can provide doctors with a hint about whether that child may develop asthma later in life, thus allowing them to start treating him or her in order to prevent the disease. Researchers have found that four bacteria found in the faeces of a…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Martin J. Blaser, director of the Department of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine, is one of the world's greatest experts in the relationship between use and overuse of antibiotics and the gut microbiota. We were able to interview him during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit and discover the biological cost of antibiotic overuse, what…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Martin J. Blaser, director of the Department of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine, is one of the world's greatest experts in the relationship between use and overuse of antibiotics and the gut microbiota. We were able to interview him during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit and discover the biological cost of antibiotic overuse, what…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrice D. Cani is a researcher and Professor from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS) and team leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Université catholique de Louvain's Brussels-based Louvain Drug Research Institute. He was one of the scientists who came up with the concept of a prebiotic while working at Nathalie Delzenne’s and Marcel Roberfroid’s…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrice D. Cani is a researcher and Professor from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS) and team leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Université catholique de Louvain's Brussels-based Louvain Drug Research Institute. He was one of the scientists who came up with the concept of a prebiotic while working at Nathalie Delzenne’s and Marcel Roberfroid’s…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In the human body, immune system activity needs to be set at just the right level. Like a volume dial that must be set loud enough to hear, but not so loud that the neighbours come knocking, immune responses can be neither too high nor too low. High activity means the body starts attacking its own healthy tissues, and low…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In the human body, immune system activity needs to be set at just the right level. Like a volume dial that must be set loud enough to hear, but not so loud that the neighbours come knocking, immune responses can be neither too high nor too low. High activity means the body starts attacking its own healthy tissues, and low…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over millions of years of evolution, humans and their gut microorganisms get on well and have a mutually beneficial relationship. We provide the microorganisms with shelter and nourishment and in exchange, these hundreds of trillions of tiny microbes living inside us contribute to our health and metabolism by performing different and important tasks. One key function is how they help…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over millions of years of evolution, humans and their gut microorganisms get on well and have a mutually beneficial relationship. We provide the microorganisms with shelter and nourishment and in exchange, these hundreds of trillions of tiny microbes living inside us contribute to our health and metabolism by performing different and important tasks. One key function is how they help…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team