Category : Immune Health

When bacterial communities grow on surfaces surrounded by a matrix as a kind of protective casing, they form what is called a biofilm. Biologist Jaione Valle (born in Pamplona in 1977) has just received a L'Oréal-UNESCO 'Women in Science' grant of €15,000 for her research into the biofilm formed by gut microbiota. Her work focuses on discovering whether there is…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When bacterial communities grow on surfaces surrounded by a matrix as a kind of protective casing, they form what is called a biofilm. Biologist Jaione Valle (born in Pamplona in 1977) has just received a L'Oréal-UNESCO 'Women in Science' grant of €15,000 for her research into the biofilm formed by gut microbiota. Her work focuses on discovering whether there is…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Whether it's chicken soup to help fight a cold or garlic to fortify against the flu, tradition has it that food can influence our immune response. But does this idea hold up scientifically? According to Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK) and winner of the Danone International Prize for Nutrition, growing evidence shows…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In the traditional view of your immune system, your body is a fortress that needs to be defended. You trust your immune system to be constantly on alert for enemies like harmful bacteria and viruses, and to be able to fight them off when they attack. But Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK)…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In the traditional view of your immune system, your body is a fortress that needs to be defended. You trust your immune system to be constantly on alert for enemies like harmful bacteria and viruses, and to be able to fight them off when they attack. But Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK)…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Around 20% of children population in Western countries have asthma, the most prevalent child chronic health condition. Worldwide, there are 235 million asthmatic people, according to World Health Organisation. Until now, the disease was associated to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as air pollution. Some recent studies had also demonstrated in animal models that an altered gut…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Around 20% of children population in Western countries have asthma, the most prevalent child chronic health condition. Worldwide, there are 235 million asthmatic people, according to World Health Organisation. Until now, the disease was associated to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as air pollution. Some recent studies had also demonstrated in animal models that an altered gut…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Researchers find new correlations between the gut microbiota and immune response genes in people with multiple sclerosis During the last 15 years, scientists have started to discover that the 100 trillion microorganisms living in our digestive tract –mostly in the colon- play a key role in different body functions, like digestion and training the immune system. What’s more, they have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Researchers find new correlations between the gut microbiota and immune response genes in people with multiple sclerosis During the last 15 years, scientists have started to discover that the 100 trillion microorganisms living in our digestive tract –mostly in the colon- play a key role in different body functions, like digestion and training the immune system. What’s more, they have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Thirty-three percent of people have a gene that predisposes them to celiac disease (CD), while only two to five percent of the population will receive a diagnosis of the condition. Elena Verdú, Associate Professor and researcher at McMaster University in Canada, wants to know why the unlucky minority end up with the disease. "We know that genes are necessary, but…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Thirty-three percent of people have a gene that predisposes them to celiac disease (CD), while only two to five percent of the population will receive a diagnosis of the condition. Elena Verdú, Associate Professor and researcher at McMaster University in Canada, wants to know why the unlucky minority end up with the disease. "We know that genes are necessary, but…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team