Category : Gut Microbiota Composition

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronical autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, the brain and other organs. In Spain, between forty and fifty thousand people suffer from lupus, according to the Spanish Association of Lupus (Federación Española de Lupus). A new research study, lead by researchers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronical autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, the brain and other organs. In Spain, between forty and fifty thousand people suffer from lupus, according to the Spanish Association of Lupus (Federación Española de Lupus). A new research study, lead by researchers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

There are an endless number of differences between men and women and one of those differences is that eating exactly the same diet affects the gut microbiota composition of men and women differently, as a new study has recently showed. As we have already explained in this blog, it’s a well-known fact that the food we eat and our lifestyles…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

There are an endless number of differences between men and women and one of those differences is that eating exactly the same diet affects the gut microbiota composition of men and women differently, as a new study has recently showed. As we have already explained in this blog, it’s a well-known fact that the food we eat and our lifestyles…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Baguette and sliced bread lovers, we’ve got good news for you! For years,  it’s been criticized for its bad nutritional reputation and has been shunned as a mere glutinous slab lacking any health benefits, but white bread may help boost some of the beneficial gut microbes, according to a new paper recently published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Baguette and sliced bread lovers, we’ve got good news for you! For years,  it’s been criticized for its bad nutritional reputation and has been shunned as a mere glutinous slab lacking any health benefits, but white bread may help boost some of the beneficial gut microbes, according to a new paper recently published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Exercise is known to be essential for both our mental and our physical health. It is good for the heart, for keeping weight down and may help prevent some kinds of cancer; moreover, it can help keep our spirits up, as well as boosting our creativity and learning. According to a new study recently published in Gut, however, the benefits…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Exercise is known to be essential for both our mental and our physical health. It is good for the heart, for keeping weight down and may help prevent some kinds of cancer; moreover, it can help keep our spirits up, as well as boosting our creativity and learning. According to a new study recently published in Gut, however, the benefits…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The mix of bacteria that live in our gut changes throughout the year, to match the food we eat in every specific season. For example, bacteria that process fresh fruit and vegetables are more abundant in the summer, and those that process fats are mode abundant in winter times. A group of scientists at the University of Chicago has found…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The mix of bacteria that live in our gut changes throughout the year, to match the food we eat in every specific season. For example, bacteria that process fresh fruit and vegetables are more abundant in the summer, and those that process fats are mode abundant in winter times. A group of scientists at the University of Chicago has found…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The DNA of the microbes conserved on the fossilised teeth of our ancestors – specifically the ones from the bacteria calcified in their tartar or dental calculus – contains a lot of information about the microbiota inhabiting the guts of the civilisations that lived thousands of years ago. With this finding, we can now discover the effects of dietary changes…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The DNA of the microbes conserved on the fossilised teeth of our ancestors – specifically the ones from the bacteria calcified in their tartar or dental calculus – contains a lot of information about the microbiota inhabiting the guts of the civilisations that lived thousands of years ago. With this finding, we can now discover the effects of dietary changes…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Science has been showing for a while now that, in the long term, the saying ‘you are what you eat’ is true, or at least in terms of the composition of our gut microbiota. Until recently, however, we didn’t know how quickly the microbiota – or the hundreds of trillions of bacteria and microorganisms that live in our digestive system…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Science has been showing for a while now that, in the long term, the saying ‘you are what you eat’ is true, or at least in terms of the composition of our gut microbiota. Until recently, however, we didn’t know how quickly the microbiota – or the hundreds of trillions of bacteria and microorganisms that live in our digestive system…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We interviewed Prof. Paul O’Toole, Senior Lecturer at University College Cork, to discuss bacterial colonisation, or how bacteria reach the digestive tract from birth. The kind of birth, the family environment and food are some of the factors that initially influence the development of the gut microbiota, explains Prof. O’Toole. With time, the microbiota stabilises (except when we are affected…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We interviewed Prof. Paul O’Toole, Senior Lecturer at University College Cork, to discuss bacterial colonisation, or how bacteria reach the digestive tract from birth. The kind of birth, the family environment and food are some of the factors that initially influence the development of the gut microbiota, explains Prof. O’Toole. With time, the microbiota stabilises (except when we are affected…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have already explained that the bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract – the gut microbiota – carry out key functions in terms of people’s health. Among these tasks, this “organ” (as described by some scientists) plays an essential role in our body’s defences. A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (USA) recently observed that the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have already explained that the bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract – the gut microbiota – carry out key functions in terms of people’s health. Among these tasks, this “organ” (as described by some scientists) plays an essential role in our body’s defences. A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (USA) recently observed that the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team