Paul Enck

Written by Paul Enck

Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

This Chinese study aimed to characterize the gut microbiota of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD): one group of patients with acute MDD (who scored high on a depression scale, indicating clinically significant depression), called 'active-MDD', and a second group of patients with a history of MDD who had responded to treatment (achieving a 50% reduction in depression scale scores…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

This Chinese study aimed to characterize the gut microbiota of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD): one group of patients with acute MDD (who scored high on a depression scale, indicating clinically significant depression), called 'active-MDD', and a second group of patients with a history of MDD who had responded to treatment (achieving a 50% reduction in depression scale scores…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

If a healthy mother consumes probiotics in the perinatal period, does it affect allergy-related diseases in her child at six years of age? In this study, 415 pregnant women were randomised to consume either probiotic or placebo milk from 36 weeks gestation until 3 months postpartum. The probiotic milk contained three strains: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. acidophilus La-5, and Bifidobacterium…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

If a healthy mother consumes probiotics in the perinatal period, does it affect allergy-related diseases in her child at six years of age? In this study, 415 pregnant women were randomised to consume either probiotic or placebo milk from 36 weeks gestation until 3 months postpartum. The probiotic milk contained three strains: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. acidophilus La-5, and Bifidobacterium…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A meta-analysis of 12 randomized, controlled trials, with a total of 3720 participants, examined the effectiveness and safety of probiotics in preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in children, adults, and older people. Probiotics, compared to placebo, were associated with fewer URTIs overall, shorter duration of URTI episodes, fewer antibiotic prescriptions, and fewer URTI-related school absences. Probiotics appeared safe…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A meta-analysis of 12 randomized, controlled trials, with a total of 3720 participants, examined the effectiveness and safety of probiotics in preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in children, adults, and older people. Probiotics, compared to placebo, were associated with fewer URTIs overall, shorter duration of URTI episodes, fewer antibiotic prescriptions, and fewer URTI-related school absences. Probiotics appeared safe…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A study by De Palma, et al. used germ-free and specific pathogen-free mouse models to investigate the effects of early-life stress. Researchers reported that stress (maternal separation) altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice. Colonizing adult germ-free mice with the same microbiota led to distinct microbial profiles in mice who had experienced early-life stress. After colonization, behaviour was altered in the stressed…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A study by De Palma, et al. used germ-free and specific pathogen-free mouse models to investigate the effects of early-life stress. Researchers reported that stress (maternal separation) altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice. Colonizing adult germ-free mice with the same microbiota led to distinct microbial profiles in mice who had experienced early-life stress. After colonization, behaviour was altered in the stressed…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

We are pleased to introduce the second edition of our « Best of » series! This edition is a summary of the latest scientific research on the gut microbiota and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is a selection of content from the ESNM's Gut Microbiota for Health website, compiled and edited by Prof. Philippe Marteau and Harry Sokol, in partnership with…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

We are pleased to introduce the second edition of our « Best of » series! This edition is a summary of the latest scientific research on the gut microbiota and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is a selection of content from the ESNM's Gut Microbiota for Health website, compiled and edited by Prof. Philippe Marteau and Harry Sokol, in partnership with…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous studies have shown both genetics and the gut microbiome influence a host's metabolic phenotype. By analyzing the fecal samples of twins, researchers found that the abundance of many microbial taxa in the gut were influenced by genetics. The family Christensenellaceae was the most heritable, and co-occurred with a group of other microorganisms. This heritable group was associated with a…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous studies have shown both genetics and the gut microbiome influence a host's metabolic phenotype. By analyzing the fecal samples of twins, researchers found that the abundance of many microbial taxa in the gut were influenced by genetics. The family Christensenellaceae was the most heritable, and co-occurred with a group of other microorganisms. This heritable group was associated with a…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Two primary goals of translational microbiota research are (1) to alter the gut microbiota in a beneficial manner and (2) to do so in a way that lasts. In patients with liver disease, hyperammonemia-associated neurotoxicity and encephalopathy occurs when bacterial urease in the intestine converts urea from the host into ammonia and carbon dioxide. Researchers in this study wanted to…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Two primary goals of translational microbiota research are (1) to alter the gut microbiota in a beneficial manner and (2) to do so in a way that lasts. In patients with liver disease, hyperammonemia-associated neurotoxicity and encephalopathy occurs when bacterial urease in the intestine converts urea from the host into ammonia and carbon dioxide. Researchers in this study wanted to…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Millions of colonoscopies are performed each year in the United States and Europe. In the days following colonoscopy, up to one fifth of patients experience abdominal pain. The investigators conducting this study wondered if these pain symptoms are related to alterations in gut microbiota that occur in the process of bowel preparation. In this study, patients were randomized to consume…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Millions of colonoscopies are performed each year in the United States and Europe. In the days following colonoscopy, up to one fifth of patients experience abdominal pain. The investigators conducting this study wondered if these pain symptoms are related to alterations in gut microbiota that occur in the process of bowel preparation. In this study, patients were randomized to consume…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

In this Nature Medicine news article, Roxanne Khamsi reports on research around the world showing the microbiome exerts an influence on the human immune system. If scientists knew how to control the key process of inflammation, they could profoundly influence the course of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, heart disease, and liver disease. Khamsi covers several possibilities on how…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

In this Nature Medicine news article, Roxanne Khamsi reports on research around the world showing the microbiome exerts an influence on the human immune system. If scientists knew how to control the key process of inflammation, they could profoundly influence the course of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, heart disease, and liver disease. Khamsi covers several possibilities on how…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

After intestinal anastomosis -- resection and reconnection of intestinal segments -- the intestine sometimes fails to heal. Leakage, peritonitis, and sepsis can result: in other words, anastomotic leak. The underlying cause of this complication is unknown, but evidence is growing that intestinal microbes play a role. Authors of this paper showed the commensal bacterium Enterococcus faecalis contributes to the development…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

After intestinal anastomosis -- resection and reconnection of intestinal segments -- the intestine sometimes fails to heal. Leakage, peritonitis, and sepsis can result: in other words, anastomotic leak. The underlying cause of this complication is unknown, but evidence is growing that intestinal microbes play a role. Authors of this paper showed the commensal bacterium Enterococcus faecalis contributes to the development…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.