Cristina Sáez

Written by Cristina Sáez

Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Researchers find new correlations between the gut microbiota and immune response genes in people with multiple sclerosis During the last 15 years, scientists have started to discover that the 100 trillion microorganisms living in our digestive tract –mostly in the colon- play a key role in different body functions, like digestion and training the immune system. What’s more, they have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Researchers find new correlations between the gut microbiota and immune response genes in people with multiple sclerosis During the last 15 years, scientists have started to discover that the 100 trillion microorganisms living in our digestive tract –mostly in the colon- play a key role in different body functions, like digestion and training the immune system. What’s more, they have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

You may already know that a more diverse gut microbiota is linked to better general health. And when you think of what you can eat to boost microbial diversity, you might be thinking about fruit, veggies, and whole grain foods. If so, you are completely correct: these are all excellent choices for taking good care of your gut microbial community.…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

You may already know that a more diverse gut microbiota is linked to better general health. And when you think of what you can eat to boost microbial diversity, you might be thinking about fruit, veggies, and whole grain foods. If so, you are completely correct: these are all excellent choices for taking good care of your gut microbial community.…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Although breast milk is a baby's first food, it also contains certain compounds – especially some fibres and oligosaccharides –that are not meant for the infant but for an army of bacterial diners that start colonising the child's gut at birth. “Breast milk's first impact is to favour the colonisation of the gut by specific bacterial groups that can digest these…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Although breast milk is a baby's first food, it also contains certain compounds – especially some fibres and oligosaccharides –that are not meant for the infant but for an army of bacterial diners that start colonising the child's gut at birth. “Breast milk's first impact is to favour the colonisation of the gut by specific bacterial groups that can digest these…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When a new baby is born, family and friends cannot resist guessing whom the infant takes after: whether she has inherited blue eyes from her mother, or whether his nose looks exactly like his father’s. The DNA we inherit from our parents influences how we look, of course, as well as our risk of certain diseases, and our cognitive abilities.…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When a new baby is born, family and friends cannot resist guessing whom the infant takes after: whether she has inherited blue eyes from her mother, or whether his nose looks exactly like his father’s. The DNA we inherit from our parents influences how we look, of course, as well as our risk of certain diseases, and our cognitive abilities.…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Babies are born with immature immune systems. Until now, it was believed that the birth process was the first opportunity for microorganisms from the mother to colonize the baby’s gut and, thus, to shape the immune system. Now, a team formed by German and Swiss scientists have discovered that this interaction with the baby’s immune system starts much earlier than…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Insects do it, rabbits and chimpanzees too; even your dog is at it. Many animals consume excrement in search of vital nutrients, like vitamins and minerals, as well as bacteria. Coprophagia, as this practice is called, is not very attractive for humans, but we have, however, been doing it for several years (although we haven't been munching on poo, as…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Insects do it, rabbits and chimpanzees too; even your dog is at it. Many animals consume excrement in search of vital nutrients, like vitamins and minerals, as well as bacteria. Coprophagia, as this practice is called, is not very attractive for humans, but we have, however, been doing it for several years (although we haven't been munching on poo, as…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Imagine you could lose weight simply by ‘being cold’ for a couple of weeks, as a quick attack plan. Doesn't it sound like the perfect solution? This is what a team of scientists from the University of Geneva in Switzerland have just shown, at least in mice. According to the conclusions of a new study, recently published in Cell, being…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Imagine you could lose weight simply by ‘being cold’ for a couple of weeks, as a quick attack plan. Doesn't it sound like the perfect solution? This is what a team of scientists from the University of Geneva in Switzerland have just shown, at least in mice. According to the conclusions of a new study, recently published in Cell, being…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In some countries like the United Kingdom and the United States, a practice among parents has become fashionable in recent months in which those who have just had a child via Caesarean section swab their newborn with the mother's vaginal fluids. This is known as 'vaginal seeding'. The aim of this practice is to try and restore the normal colonisation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In some countries like the United Kingdom and the United States, a practice among parents has become fashionable in recent months in which those who have just had a child via Caesarean section swab their newborn with the mother's vaginal fluids. This is known as 'vaginal seeding'. The aim of this practice is to try and restore the normal colonisation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Nearly 3.1 million children under five die every year due to poor nutrition, according to the World Food Programme, the world’s largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger. One in six infants (roughly 100 million) is underweight and the growth of 25% of children worldwide is stunted, a disabling consequence of malnutrition and frequent or persistent infections that undermine children's health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Nearly 3.1 million children under five die every year due to poor nutrition, according to the World Food Programme, the world’s largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger. One in six infants (roughly 100 million) is underweight and the growth of 25% of children worldwide is stunted, a disabling consequence of malnutrition and frequent or persistent infections that undermine children's health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

"If you want to live longer, don’t be alone, surround yourself with people you love and with whom you can share life’s moments." More and more doctors are giving this kind of advice to their patients, as socialising is believed to help us live longer and healthier. It could also act as a protective shield against much-feared neurodegenerative diseases like…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

"If you want to live longer, don’t be alone, surround yourself with people you love and with whom you can share life’s moments." More and more doctors are giving this kind of advice to their patients, as socialising is believed to help us live longer and healthier. It could also act as a protective shield against much-feared neurodegenerative diseases like…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina