In a recent paper by Perry et al., researchers describe an investigation into the putative mechanisms by which gut microbiota alterations may lead to obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. Authors describe increased production of acetate by altered gut microbiota in rats. They link this to activation of the parasympathetic nervous system, increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, higher ghrelin secretion, hyperphagia, and obesity. Thus, they point to increased acetate production as a driver of metabolic syndrome.

A recent review, led by Dr Nuria Salazar from the Institute of Dairy Products of Asturias (Spain), belonging to the Spanish National Research Council, summarizes the up-to-date scientific evidence regarding the role of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in host health and the impact of diet on their production.

Patrick Veiga and MetaHIT colleagues tested how fermented milks product could modulate microbiota. Using a metagenomics approach, they found that the abundance of unknown species increased in the gut when patients took the fermented milk product. Having access to the

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

Filipe De Vadder is a molecular biologist in Gilles Mithieux group and published recently an important article in Cell journal which illustrate how gut microbiota fermentation product could impact neural communication. He accepted for GMFH to give us some highlights.