The term synbiotic, less known than probiotics or prebiotics, was born in 1995. In 2019, a group of scientists came together to propose a new definition. Discover why synbiotics are more than simply a probiotic-prebiotic combination and how they can benefit you.

Scientists agree that having a gut microbiota that is in ‘good shape’ is a crucial component of individual health and well-being. Although exactly how ‘good shape’ is defined is not so clear, many experts recommend consuming more live dietary microbes through including fermented foods that retain live microbial components.

Food, and its food components, nutrients or additives, can affect the composition and function of the gut microbiota. This article provides a summary of the food components that contribute to optimal microbiota health and explains how they can impact it.

Fermented foods are an increasing focus of interest for both scientists and consumers. Few modern foods are a significant source of live microbes, and fermented foods can be the exception. What do we know about how those dietary microbes impact our gut microbiota and our health?

Get to know the Lactobacilli family

2 Dec 2020

by GMFH Editing Team

This infographic lets you find out more about Lactobacillus, one of gut microbiota’s main microorganisms, along with information on how it functions and in which foods it is present.

Fermented foods are trendy and consuming them is good for your gut health. Learn more about the science behind fermented foods, their beneficial effects, and why not all qualify as probiotics.

How to eat for a diverse microbiota

29 Oct 2020

by GMFH Editing Team

Did you know that diet is one of the key factors that influence the composition of the gut microbiota? A new infographic from GMFH gives you the basics on the link between nutrition, gut microbiota and diversity.

COVID-19 has led to renewed interest in how to support immunity and the role of food in ensuring the immune system is ready to react. Taking care of your immune system is not only important during a pandemic, but also for every stage of life (Part 2).