Two studies led by Spanish scientists from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and published in the Nature group journals Scientific Report and ISME Journal, respectively, have, for the first time, quantified and classified the effects of some disorders on our gut microbiota based on studies of the substances produced by bacteria when decomposing food molecules, the metabolites.

For the study’s principal researcher, Professor Sven Pettersson of the Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology at Karolinska Institutet, “Given that the microbiota’s composition and diversity change over time, it is tempting to speculate that the blood brain-barrier’s integrity may also fluctuate depending on the microbiota.”

Results published in the October issue of mBIO magazine showed an imbalance in the ratio of the two largest groups of microorganisms in the human gut (Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) in favour of Bacteriodetes, while the overall bacterial load and diversity was similar between patients and controls.

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of

We have already explained that the bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract – the gut microbiota – carry out key functions in terms of people’s health. Among these tasks, this “organ” (as described by some scientists) plays an essential role

In spite of being a technique that professionals began to practice and research decades ago, gut microbiota transplantation is an issue that is sparking considerable interest right now as a possible treatment for infections of the intestine (especially those produced