Can gut bacteria control your appetite?

27 Apr 2016

by Kristina Campbell

Can gut microbes generate cravings? Can they make you feel unsatisfied until you eat the food they need for their own survival? These were the questions covered by a scientific review published in BioEssays in 2014.

Genes are only one part of how IBD arises. The other parts are less clear, but equally important in the quest to understand how to prevent and treat these conditions. A new report, Gut microbiota and inflammatory bowel disease, published by the Gut Microbiota for Health Experts Exchange platform and edited by Professors Philippe Marteau and Harry Sokol, gives an overview of the new theories on the disordered physiology of IBD.

A team of scientists led by Premysl Bercik, Associate Professor of Medicine at McMaster’s Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, carried out two sets of experiments with mice with the goal of studying the effect of gut microbiota on behaviour in an established model of anxiety and depression.

Two studies led by Spanish scientists from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and published in the Nature group journals Scientific Report and ISME Journal, respectively, have, for the first time, quantified and classified the effects of some disorders on our gut microbiota based on studies of the substances produced by bacteria when decomposing food molecules, the metabolites.