Andreu Prados

About Andreu Prados

Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, led by Dr. Ellen Blaak from the Department of Human Biology at Maastricht University Medical Centre in Maastricht (The Netherlands), has found that a 7-day antibiotic treatment does not affect host metabolism in obese humans in the short term, despite profound changes in gut microbial diversity and composition.

It is already known that a reduction in gut microbial richness is the hallmark change of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, but how this dysbiosis is established in the HIV-exposed uninfected infant is poorly understood. A recent cross-sectional study, led by Dr. Grace M. Aldrovandi from the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles in Los Angeles (USA), suggests that perturbations in the infant gut microbiome may explain the greater risk of morbidity and mortality in uninfected babies born to HIV-positive mothers.

A recent study, led by Dr. Deanna L. Gibson from the Department of Biology at the University of British Columbia (Canada), has found that cardiorespiratory fitness is correlated with increased microbial diversity and increased production of faecal butyrate in healthy humans.

A recent study, led by Dr. Wendy A. Henderson from the National Institute of Nursing Research at National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda (USA), and co-authored by Research Fellow Dr. Nicolaas Fourie, has found that the oral microbiota could be a useful source of information in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Two recent studies, led by Dr. Veena Taneja from the Department of Immunology and Division of Rheumatology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester (USA), allow a better understanding of the role of gut microbiota in people with rheumatoid arthritis and how manipulation of the gut microbiota may provide an additional approach to therapy.

Recent advances in research have described the importance of gut microbiota in influencing interactions between the central and the enteric nervous systems. These brain-gut interactions appear to be bidirectional by means of neural, endocrine, immune, and humoral signals. Most of the data have been acquired using rodents (mice or rats) and pigs.