MICROBIOTA INTESTINAL

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Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
La escritora científica Kristina Campbell (M.Sc), residente en la Columbia Británica, en Canadá, es especializada en comunicación sobre microbiota intestinal, salud digestiva y nutrición. Autora del existoso libro Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, ha publicado sus artículos como freelance en revistas del mundo entero. Kristina se unió al equipo de edición de Gut Microbiota for Health en 2014. Pueden seguir a Kristina en: GoogleTwitter

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
La escritora científica Kristina Campbell (M.Sc), residente en la Columbia Británica, en Canadá, es especializada en comunicación sobre microbiota intestinal, salud digestiva y nutrición. Autora del existoso libro Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, ha publicado sus artículos como freelance en revistas del mundo entero. Kristina se unió al equipo de edición de Gut Microbiota for Health en 2014. Pueden seguir a Kristina en: GoogleTwitter

Blurred or double vision; numbness in the arms, legs, or face; problems with balance when walking. These are some of the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects 2.3 million people worldwide, most of whom are women around 30 years old. There is currently no cure—nor are the causes known. We do know,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Sáez es periodista freelance especializada en ciencia. Trabaja para diversos medios de comunicación, como el diario La Vanguardia, donde coordina la sección de ciencia Big Vang; y colabora con centros de investigación y sociedades científicas. Su trabajo periodístico ha sido reconocido, entre otros, con el Premio de Periodismo en Medicina Boerhinger Ingelheim 2015. El Twitter de Cristina @saez_cristina

Blurred or double vision; numbness in the arms, legs, or face; problems with balance when walking. These are some of the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects 2.3 million people worldwide, most of whom are women around 30 years old. There is currently no cure—nor are the causes known. We do know,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Sáez es periodista freelance especializada en ciencia. Trabaja para diversos medios de comunicación, como el diario La Vanguardia, donde coordina la sección de ciencia Big Vang; y colabora con centros de investigación y sociedades científicas. Su trabajo periodístico ha sido reconocido, entre otros, con el Premio de Periodismo en Medicina Boerhinger Ingelheim 2015. El Twitter de Cristina @saez_cristina
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Últimas noticias

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the…

Blurred or double vision; numbness in the arms, legs, or face; problems with balance when walking. These are some of the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects…