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Deep inside your small intestine is a region that’s critical in the body’s immune system: the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). At this site, your body’s cells interact with both microbes and immune cells, and the results of their interactions decide whether you will tolerate the things encountered in the gut—whether a particular food molecule or a foreign microbe—or alternatively, whether…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Deep inside your small intestine is a region that’s critical in the body’s immune system: the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). At this site, your body’s cells interact with both microbes and immune cells, and the results of their interactions decide whether you will tolerate the things encountered in the gut—whether a particular food molecule or a foreign microbe—or alternatively, whether…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The intestinal microbiota appears to be a key determinant of health and disease. Indeed, microbiota differences are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the method by which alterations in the microbiota composition (influenced by genetics, the environment, and diet) contribute to IBD pathogenesis is not well understood. In a recently published paper in…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The intestinal microbiota appears to be a key determinant of health and disease. Indeed, microbiota differences are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the method by which alterations in the microbiota composition (influenced by genetics, the environment, and diet) contribute to IBD pathogenesis is not well understood. In a recently published paper in…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.