Tag Archives: probiotics

It is suspected that early-life gut microbiota colonization can result in long-lasting consequences that may increase the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood. The first 3 years of life appear to represent the most critical period for dietary interventions with the goal of manipulating microbiota to improve child growth and development and positively affect health. The role of perinatal nutrition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

It is suspected that early-life gut microbiota colonization can result in long-lasting consequences that may increase the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood. The first 3 years of life appear to represent the most critical period for dietary interventions with the goal of manipulating microbiota to improve child growth and development and positively affect health. The role of perinatal nutrition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that the human gut microbiota may mediate suppression of carcinogenesis through its interaction with host immunity. Among cancer types, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States. However, little is known regarding whether manipulating the gut microbiota could help in its prevention and…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the human gut microbiota may mediate suppression of carcinogenesis through its interaction with host immunity. Among cancer types, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States. However, little is known regarding whether manipulating the gut microbiota could help in its prevention and…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Gut microbiota may influence the effectiveness of the drugs we take and even medical treatments for infections—such as those caused by HIV—or cancer. This was one of the main messages presented at the latest edition of BDebate, an international experts' conference promoted by Biocat - the organization that coordinates and promotes the healthcare and life sciences sector in Catalonia- and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Gut microbiota may influence the effectiveness of the drugs we take and even medical treatments for infections—such as those caused by HIV—or cancer. This was one of the main messages presented at the latest edition of BDebate, an international experts' conference promoted by Biocat - the organization that coordinates and promotes the healthcare and life sciences sector in Catalonia- and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Gut Microbiota for Health is pleased to announce its participation at the 21st International Congress of Nutrition (ICN).  Organized by the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) with the theme “From Sciences to Nutrition Security”, the event will take place at the Hotel Sheraton, Buenos Aires (Argentina) from October 15th to 20th, 2017. IUNS promotes advancement in nutrition science, research,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut Microbiota for Health is pleased to announce its participation at the 21st International Congress of Nutrition (ICN).  Organized by the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) with the theme “From Sciences to Nutrition Security”, the event will take place at the Hotel Sheraton, Buenos Aires (Argentina) from October 15th to 20th, 2017. IUNS promotes advancement in nutrition science, research,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Scientifically reliable information helps you make the best choices for your health. Yet it can be surprisingly difficult to get straight answers on probiotics and prebiotics; an online search can turn up contradictory or confusing information. The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP)—an organization of scientists with a mission of advancing scientific excellence in the area of probiotics…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Scientifically reliable information helps you make the best choices for your health. Yet it can be surprisingly difficult to get straight answers on probiotics and prebiotics; an online search can turn up contradictory or confusing information. The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP)—an organization of scientists with a mission of advancing scientific excellence in the area of probiotics…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) held its annual meeting in Chicago at the end of June, 2017. This meeting featured the latest science in the probiotic and prebiotic fields, consistent with ISAPP’s mission to advance the science of probiotics and prebiotics. Topics of discussion ranged from "How to define useful biomarkers for health?" to an update…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) held its annual meeting in Chicago at the end of June, 2017. This meeting featured the latest science in the probiotic and prebiotic fields, consistent with ISAPP’s mission to advance the science of probiotics and prebiotics. Topics of discussion ranged from "How to define useful biomarkers for health?" to an update…

Mary Ellen Sanders
Mary Ellen Sanders is a consultant in the area of probiotic microbiology, with special expertise on paths to scientific substantiation of probiotic product label claims. Dr. Sanders served as the founding president of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and is currently the organization’s Director of Scientific Affairs/ Executive Officer. This international, non-profit association of academic and industrial scientists is dedicated to advancing the science of probiotics and prebiotics (www.isapp.net). Through numerous written, oral and video pieces, including a website, www.usprobiotics.org, she strives to provide objective, evidence-based information on probiotics for consumers and professionals. Key activities include: Panels to determine GRAS status of probiotic strains ; member of the American Gastroenterological Association Scientific Advisory Board for AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research and Education ; World Gastroenterology Organisation Committee preparing practice guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics for GI indications (2008, 2011, 2014) ; working group convened by the FAO/WHO that developed guidelines for probiotics (2002).

Thinking about travelling this summer to Bali or French Polynesia? Maybe, while you’re reading these lines, you picture yourself lying on a beautiful beach, drinking smoothies, sunbathing and taking dips. Sounds good, really good. But, beware the health problems caused by jetlag during the days after your flight. Fatigue, sleeplessness, dizziness, sleepiness, hunger and even intestinal problems, such as constipation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Thinking about travelling this summer to Bali or French Polynesia? Maybe, while you’re reading these lines, you picture yourself lying on a beautiful beach, drinking smoothies, sunbathing and taking dips. Sounds good, really good. But, beware the health problems caused by jetlag during the days after your flight. Fatigue, sleeplessness, dizziness, sleepiness, hunger and even intestinal problems, such as constipation…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.